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BLM LIBRARY 





U.S. Department of the Interior 

Bureau of Land Management 

Lakeview District Office 
1000 Ninth Street S. 
Lakeview, Oregon 97630 



September 1993 



Lakeview District Planning Update 

Lakeview Resource Area 
Klamath Falls Resource Area 




Way Cemetary in Klamath Canyon (photo by Ron Hicks) 



As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the Department of the Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally owned public lands and 
natural resources. This includes fostering the wisest use of our land and water resources, protecting our fish and wildlife, preserving the 
environmental and cultural values of our national parks and historical places, and providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor recreation. 
The Department assesses our energy and mineral resources and works to assure that their development is in the best interest of all our people. 
The Department also has a major responsibility for American Indian reservation communities and for people who live in Island Territories under 
U.S. administration. 



BLM/OR/WA/PL-93/49+1 792 



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U.S. Department of the Interior 

Bureau of Land Management 

Lakeview District Office 
1000 Ninth Street South 
Lakeview, Oregon 97630-0055 




Introduction 



This planning update is part of the Bureau of Land Management's continuing commitment to keep the public informed and 
involved in the day-to-day management of the public lands in eastern Oregon. It is our hope that the update will help you 
understand land management decisions and proposals involving the BLM's Lakeview District, which is comprised of the 
Lakeview and Klamath Falls Resource Areas. 

The previous two updates only covered the Lakeview Resource Area. This year we've added information on the Klamath 
Falls Resource Area as well. The Klamath Falls Resource Area is participating in the resource management planning effort 
covering western Oregon's BLM-administered lands. It is anticipated that similar district-wide reports will be required of 
western Oregon districts once that planning effort is completed; therefore, since it is both an eastern and a western Oregon 
resource area, the Klamath Falls Resource Area was included in this document. 

This report is not intended to be a comprehensive statement of all of the activities which were completed, but rather a 
summary report. 



iWhat You Can Find In This Document I 



Updates like this one will be developed annually. While a 
flexible format will be maintained, major sections similar 
to those described below will be included in each edition. 

Feature Report: Reports in this section highlight topics 
of concern or interest in the Lakeview Resource Area 
(The Warner Wetlands Restoration Project) and the 
Klamath Falls Resource Area (Wood River Ranch 
Acquisition.) 

Summary of Work: This section identifies the Lakeview 
Resource Area's fiscal years 92 and 93 and Klamath Falls' 
fiscal year 93 accomplishments. Also included in each 
section is the proposed work plan for the upcoming fiscal 
year 94. 



Environmental Assessment Register: Listed in this 
section are those environmental assessments (EAs) started 
or completed in fiscal year 1993. This section is included 
to improve public participation in the process used to 
analyze potential impacts of actions on-the-ground. 

Rangeland Program Summary: This section updates 
the Lakeview and Klamath Falls Resource Area's Range- 
land Program Summary (RPS) 

This mailer should bring you up-to-date with activities 
completed, planned, or in progress in both resource areas 
of the Lakeview District. Any comments regarding the 
format or content of the mailer should be sent to: Bureau 
of Land Management, Lakeview District, P.O. Box 151 , 
Lakeview, OR 97630. 



Table of Contents 



Introduction - 1 

What You Can Find In This Document 1 

LAKE VIEW DISTRICT 4 

DistrictVolunteers Make a Difference in 1992 4 

District Volunteer Activities in 1993 4 

Planned District Volunteer Activities in 1994 5 

LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA 7 

Introduction to the Lakeview Resource Area 8 

The Warner Wetlands Restoration Project 8 

Program Summaries and Accomplishments 9 

Botany 9 

Cultural/Paleontological Resources 10 

Fire/Aviation 11 

Forestry 12 

Hazardous Materials Management 12 

Lands and Realty 13 

Law Enforcement 14 

Minerals 15 

Range and Noxious Weed Management 16 

Recreation Resources 17 

Riparian/Wetland Management 19 

Wilderness 22 

Wild Horses and Burros 22 

Wildlife and Fisheries 22 

1993 Environmental Assessment Register 24 

Rangeland Program Summary (RPS) 26 

Grazing Management Program 31 

KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA 37 

Wood River Ranch Acquisition Update 40 

Ecosystem Based Management 42 

Resource Management Plan (RMP/EIS) Update 42 

RAP Camp 42 

Lorella Pumped Storage Project 43 

Program Summaries and Accomplishments 44 

Botany 44 

Cultural/Paleontological Resources 45 

Fire/Aviation 45 

Forestry 45 

Hazardous Materials Management 46 

Lands and Realty 47 

Law Enforcement 47 

Minerals 47 

Noxious Weed Management 47 

Range Management 48 

Recreation Resources 49 

Riparian/Wetland Management 50 

Wild Horses and Burros 51 



Wild& Scenic Rivers 52 

Wilderness 52 

Wildlife and Fisheries ■ 52 

1993 Environmental Assessment Register - Klamath Falls 56 

Rangeland Program Summary (RPS) Update 58 

Grazing Management Program 60 

Mailing List Update for the Lakeview Resource Area 65 

Mailing List Update for the Klamath Falls Resource Area 66 

MAPS 

Lakeview Resource Area 6 

Klamath Falls Resource Area 38 

Wood River Ranch 40 



ACRONYMS 



ACEC 

AMP 

APHIS 

AUM 

BLM 

CRMP 

DSL 

EA 

EIS 

EPPC 

FC2 

FERC 

FLPMA 

FY 

HMA 

HMP 

IMP 

ISTEA 

KFRA 

MFP 

MOU 

NAWCA 

NEPA 

NWR 

ODA 

ODFW 

RMP 

RNA 

ROD 

RPS 

TNC 

WMA 

WRWT 

WSA 



Area of Critical Environmental Concern 

Allotment Management Plan 

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 

Animal Unit Month 

Bureau of Land Management 

Coordinated Resource Management Plan 

Division of State Lands 

Environmental Assessment 

Environmental Impact Statement 

Exotic Pest Plant Council 

Federal Candidate Category 2 

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 

Federal Land Policy and Management Act 

Fiscal Year 

Herd Management Area 

Habitat Management Plan 

Interim Management Plan 

Intermoble Surface Transportation Efficiency Act 

Klamath Falls Resource Area 

Management Framework Plan 

Memoradum of Understanding 

North American Wetlands Conservation Council 

National Environmental Policy Act 

National Wildlife Refuge 

Oregon Department of Agriculture 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 

Resource Management Plan 

Research Natural Area 

Record of Decision 

Rangeland Program Summary 

The Nature Conservancy 

Wetlands Management Area 

Wood River Wetland Team 

Wilderness Study Area 



Lakeview District 



The Lakeview District boundary of the Bureau of Land Management encompasses approximately 3.5 million acres in 
Klamath, Lake, and part of Harney counties in southeastern Oregon. The district is divided into two resource areas: Klamath 
Falls Resource Area and Lakeview Resource Area. The two resource areas differ somewhat in the types of management 
activities that occur due to the differences in the types of major resources present. Volunteer activities throughout the district 
are discussed, followed by program accomplishements and work planned for 1994. 



District Volunteers 
Make a Difference in 
1992 



A total of 146 volunteers helped the district during fiscal 
year 1992, which was triple the 1991 participation. The 
following list of accomplishments attests to the variety of 
the projects: 

* Cut junipers were placed in reservoirs around the 

Gerber area to enhance wildlife habitat. 

* Tree snags were removed to prevent hazards to reser- 

voir boaters. 

* A field inventory of homestead sites was done on public 

lands to locate potentially hazardous wells and water 
facilities. 

* A hang gliding launch was built at Doherty Slide. 

* Mapping, testing and evaluating was done on archaeo- 

logical sites. Much of the archaeological work was 
done through field schools affiliated with the Univer- 
sity of Nevada-Reno, University of Oregon, and 
South Dakota School of Mines. This was the second 
year for the archaeological field schools. 

* John Parker of SPOKES Unlimited, a wheelchair 

accessible organization, volunteered 16 hours to 
assess projects and campsite standards for handi- 
capped users. 

* Four youngsters spent 36 hours improving campground 

facilities at Gerber Reservoir by cleaning up the area 
and painting toilet facilities. 



* The Klamath Tribe coordinated with the Klamath Falls 

Resource Area in protecting archaeological sites by 
doing site inventories. 

* The Rogue Valley Hang Gliding Association and 

Oregon Department of Transportation joined forces 
and contributed over 100 hours to construct the 
Doherty Slide hang gliding launch site. 

At the end of the year, after tallying all the benefits and 
expenses of the various projects, the volunteer work was 
valued at over $77,000. 



District Volunteer 
Activities in 1993 



Wildlife enhancement and recreational use sites headlined 
the Lakeview District's 1993 Volunteer Program. One of 
the earliest activities was on Memorial Day weekend in 
the Lost Forest area (Lakeview Resource Area). At that 
site, 200 feet of split rail fencing was placed along a spur 
road to prevent potential damage to the surrounding area 
from use of the road. 

* A cooperative effort among the University of Nevada- 

Reno, the University of Oregon, and the South 
Dakota School of Mines in their field school pro- 
grams conducted mapping, testing, and evaluations 
on archaeological sites. 

*A viewing blind and trail were built around the Warner 
Wetlands' Hart Bar area to increase public viewing 
opportunities. 

* During June there was a general clean up and securing 

of launch site materials at the Doherty Slide launch 
used for hang gliding. 



* Also in June, the Gerber Reservoir boat ramp sign was 

installed and the site dedicated. 

* Two toilets and changing rooms were built at the 

Klamath River rafting put-in. Constructed loop 
drive, parking area, and rafting boat launch. 

* A fish trail platform, approximately 12' x 15', was built 

over a portion of the Klamath River at the Topsy 
Campground; signs were installed; refinished existing 
picnic tables; and cleaned fire pits of ash, cans and 
glass. 

* A traffic barrier was constructed using volunteers at 

Lost Forest. A volunteer helped construct and 
maintain facilities at Lost Forest during the 1993 
Summer. 

These are just a sampling of the individual and group 
volunteer projects completed in the Lakeview District. If 
you are interested in volunteering some of your effort and 
time for future projects, please contact Lisa Swinney at 
503-947-6117. 



Planned District 
Volunteer Activities in 
1994 



* Continue to construct trails for birdwatchers at the 

Warner Wetlands. Some trails will be handicap 
accessible. 

* Construct trails at Crack-in-the-Ground area. 

* Construct an overlook at Deep Creek to increase 

viewing opportunities. 

* Replace vandalized signs at Christmas Valley. 

* Assist specialists in office work. 




One of the many volunteer projects in the Lakeview District 



Prineville District 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
Bureau of Land Management 

Map 1 

LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA 

Lakeview District 

1991 

Wagontire 



Burns District 




CALIFORNIA ! NEVADA 
I 




Lakeview District 



LEGEND 


▼ 


District Office 





District Boundary 





State Boundary 




County Boundary 





National Park Service Boundary 


© 


U.S. Highway 


® 


State Highway 








Ponderosa Pine Forest 

— : 7 



Introduction to the 
Lakeview Resource 
Area 



The Lakeview Resource Area consists of approximately 
3.1 million acres of BLM-administered land in Lake and 
Harney counties (see map on page 6). This section 
contains information on the Warner Wetlands, program 
summaries, accomplishments for fiscal year (FY) 1992 
and 1993, worked planned for FY94, a 1993 environmen- 
tal assessment register, and Rangeland Program Summary 
update. A mailing list update is included on page 65. 



The Warner Wetlands 
Restoration Project 

The Warner Valley is located approximately 35 miles 
northeast of Lakeview and is composed of a diverse 
complex of upland and wetland habitats. In 1989, the 
Lakeview Resource Area completed a management 
framework plan (MFP) amendment which designated 
approximately 50,000 acres as the Warner Wetlands Area 
of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC). The 
following year an activity plan was completed specifying 
the management objectives within the ACEC as primarily 
for waterfowl habitat. 

With the help of The Nature Conservancy, approximately 
7,500 acres of privately-owned land was acquired by the 



BLM within the ACEC. Most of this land was previously 
used as irrigated hayfields. In 1990, Ducks Unlimited 
provided a grant to allow the BLM to set up a pump to 
provide water from Hart Lake. In 1991, the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Council provided a 
grant to the BLM to repair and upgrade the existing 
irrigation system. The BLM reconstructed 26 miles of 
dikes and installed 56 water control structures. 

During 1993, the BLM drilled a well to supplement water 
from Hart Lake and provide a more reliable water source 
for future wetland management. This new water supply, 
coupled with an unusually wet winter and spring has 
restored water levels within much of the wetland system. 
This, in turn, has allowed many former wetland areas, 
which had been used as hayfields until just recently, to 
revert back to wetland habitat. This also has increased the 
health and habitat diversity of existing wetland habitats. 

A visitor contact site, consisting of an interpretive trail 
system, three shaded interpretive displays, two vault 
toilets, two photo blinds, and a parking area were com- 
pleted at Hart Bar during 1992 and 1993. These facilities 
support recreation opportunities within the ACEC and 
have been designed to accomodate people with disabili- 
ties. The Warner Wetlands ACEC was formally dedi- 
cated in September of 1993. 

Plans for the area in the near future include the construc- 
tion of a scenic overlook, interpretive trail, and parking 
area on Hart Mountain, a small campground at Campbell 
Lake, and phased construction of trails in the Swamp 
Lake area. Subsequent facilities will include an 8-mile 
canoe trail, a small camping area, and an inteipretive trail 
at Turpin Lake. 




Program Summaries and Accomplishments, 
FY92 & 93; Work Planned for FY94 

This section of the Planning Update provides a general overview of the Lakeview Resource Area's natural resource programs. 
Program descriptions are followed by the major accomplishments from FY92 (October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992) 
and FY93 (October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993). A listing of the program plans for FY94 is included, although it is 
possible that some of the proposed plans will be cut due to budget constraints. 



Botany 



The botany program ensures that special plant habitats are 
protected in the operation of the BLM's multiple use 
programs. This is achieved by conducting plant surveys 
on public lands, monitoring population trends of sensitive 
species and developing habitat management plans to 
ensure protection of sensitive species. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



* The Black Hills Habitat Management Plan (HMP) was 

reviewed and found to be adequate. Basically, all tasks 
of the HMP have been completed except for a study of 
pollinators and an interpretive brochure. Maintenance 
of the closure will need to be continued, and periodic 
monitoring of Eriogonum cusickii and Cymopterus 
nivalis. The integrity of the closure can be better 
maintained if a road leading to a guzzler is closed to 
public use. This closure will be pursued through the 
appropriate channels. 

* Preliminary work was completed on a Gratiola 

heterosepala, a federal candidate category 2 species 
(FC2), HMP. A monitoring exclosure will be built in 
early FY93 to exclude half of the population from 
grazing. Management over the next few years will 
consist of monitoring the species to determine 
whether the whole population needs to be fenced 
from grazing. Management and monitoring objec- 
tives will be added to the Round Mountain Allotment 
Management Plan (AMP), instead of preparing an 
HMP. The monitoring exclosure project for Gratiola 
heterosepala is ready to go and should be completed 
in Fall 1992. 



* One new special status plant population was found: 

Sierra onion (Allium campanulatum), a BLM 
Assessment Species. 

* Monitoring of Gratiola heterosepala: After an all-time 

high last year of 18,000 plants estimated, no plants 
were found this year. The pond where this annual 
grows was completely dry, and trespass cows had 
watered at the site. Half of the population will be 
fenced in fall 1993. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife 
Service in California is currently working on a listing 
package for this species. 

* Monitoring of Rorippa columbiae (FC2): Population 

numbers increased at Foley Lake but decreased at 
Featherbed Lake from 1991 levels. Plants were 
extremely vigorous at Foley Lake, with prolific seed 
production. 

* Monitoring of Ivesia thypara var. rhypara (FC2): This 

small population (62 plants) is doing well. Two "first 
year" plants were added to the population, and there 
was no mortality. Seventy-seven percent of the 
plants flowered, a very high percentage considering 
the severe drought, and compared to how other 
species in the area did this year. 

* Monitoring of Eriogonum cusickii: The population at 

Black Hills remains stable. New seedlings were 
noted. 

* Monitoring of Eriogonum prociduum, a Bureau 

sensitive species: Data still needs to be analyzed; 
many new seedlings were noted in the plots. 

* Written input was provided for six allotment evalua- 

tions. Background information, management 
objectives, and recommendations were made for ten 
populations of special status plants and one proposed 
research natural area (RNA). 



* Warner Wetlands Vegetation Data: A signficant 

amount of time and effort was expended computeriz- 
ing data obtained from the Warner Wetlands Vegeta- 
tion Study (200 plots, 153 species). Data is now 
ready to be analyzed using the Cornell Ecology 
Programs for community classification. However, 
due to the complexity of the analysis, additional time 
will be required. Preliminary analysis showed a clear 
distinction between wetland and upland communities. 

* Four presentations were given: Two were given to fifth 

grade school children; one to an off -road vehicle 
group regarding the Lost Forest RNA; and one to a 
group of school teachers, taking a Natural History 
class, regarding the vegetation of Warner Valley. 

* Additional Monitoring: Seventy-five percent of the 

resource area's federal candidate populations were 
revisited during the summer, and a "revisit" form of 
monitoring data was completed for each site. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Clearances for one timber sale, one prescribed fire. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Identify management and monitoring objectives for 

Gratiola heterosepala and add them to the Round 
Mountain Area Management Plan. 

* Identify management and monitoring objectives for 

Eriogonum crosbyae (FC2), at Fish Fin Rim and 
Guano Creek. Objectives will be added to the Beaty 
Butte AMP when it is prepared (scheduled for FY94). 

* Continue established monitoring study for Ivesia 

rhypara var. rhypara. Summarize data from previous 
years. Identify objectives to be added to the Beaty 
Butte AMP when it is prepared (currently scheduled 
forFY94). 

* Continue established quadrant frequency monitoring 

study for Rorippa columbiae at Foley Lake. Summa- 
rize data from previous years. Identify management 
and monitoring objectives to be added to the Coyote- 
Colvin AMP. 

* Continue established monitoring study for Eriogonum 

prociduum. Summarize data from previous years. 
Evaluate data to determine future needs. 



* Inventory 10,000 acres of the Orijana Rim Allotment in 
preparation for allotment evaluation. Emphasis will 
be placed on canyon areas such as Dudes, Rose Brier, 
and Buckhorn, as well as areas of barren soil which 
have high potential for supporting populations of 
special status plants. 



Cultural/Paleontological 
Resources 



The Lakeview Resource Area is currently responsible for 
both resource area's Cultural and Paleontological pro- 
grams which identify, plan the appropriate use of, and 
manage cultural and paleontological resources on public 
land. These programs must comply with federal and state 
law governing preservation as well as the principles of 
multiple use. The programs strive to protect cultural and 
paleontological resources on public lands for scientific 
and research purposes as well as for future generations. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



* The University of Nevada, Reno, conducted a six-week 

field school in archaeology in the lowlands and 
uplands of the Warner Lakes ACEC area. The 
information gathered will help supply the BLM with 
information which can be used in the interpretation of 
the area to the public. 

* The University of Oregon conducted a ten-week field 

school in the Fort Rock Silver Lake area. Work was 
continued on sites that had began the previous year 
with no new excavation sites. Survey work was 
completed locating nearly 40 archeological sites 
covering some 8,000 years of prehistory. 

* The University of Nevada, Reno, conducted a one-week 

training session for teachers with the purpose of 
exposing teachers to all aspects of archaeology with 
hands-on field experience. 

* In coordination with the High Desert Museum, the 

Lakeview Resource Area conducted four tours for 
groups interested in the archaeology of the region. 

* Formal and informal meetings were held with collec- 

tors during the year with the purpose of setting up a 
committee to investigate ways on how collectors 
could become involved in the management of the 
nations cultural resources of public lands. A public 



10 



display of rock art of the area was made for the 
county fair and was well received by the community. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 

In FY93 the BLM participated in five archaeological field 
schools as part of the Challenge Cost Share Program. 

* The University of Oregon concentrated on the Oil Dri 

mining operations in the Christmas Valley area. In 
addition, work was done in the upland of Squaw 
Lake and on private property in the area. The work 
on Oil Dri was aimed at the archaeological testing of 
six sites which may be impacted by future mining so 
that the BLM can determine what salvage will be 
required. Costs for the project was jointly shared by 
the BLM, Oil Dri, and the University. 

*The South Dakota School of Mines conducted a paleon- 
tological field school in the Fossil Lake area. The 
work was designed to recover exposed fossils and to 
continue to interpret the geology of the area. Dating 
of the deposits was a high priority for the year, and 
should result in one or two publications. 

* Pomona College, in conjunction with Earthwatch, 

conducted three two-week archaeology sessions in 
the Klamath River Canyon. 

* The University of Nevada, Reno conducted a three- 

week rock art field school in the Hill Camp Area in 
the Lakeview Resource Area. 

* Portland State University conducted a rock art field 

school in the Long Lake area in the Lakeview 
Resource Area. 

* Coordination with the Klamath Tribe and Shasta Nation 

has occurred on activities in the district. 

* A two-week training program for local and regional 

teachers was conducted by the BLM and University 
of Nevada, Reno. 

* Public awareness sessions were conducted at the High 

Desert Museum in Bend on the archaeology of the 
Great Basin, and in Lakeview on the archaeology of 
the Warner Valley. 



* University of Nevada, Reno: Survey and test excava- 

tions will be conducted in the Warner Valley area. 
The field school activities will assist in developing 
important information on the life-ways of the 
aboriginal peoples of the Warner Lakes ACEC and 
surrounding areas. 

* University of Oregon: Survey and test excavations will 

be performed throughout the summer in the Fort 
Rock/Silver Lake area with site locations mapped. 

* South Dakota School of Mines: Jim Martin will 

conduct a paleontological field school in the Fossil 
Lake area in the summer of 1994. 

* Pomona College: Pomona College, in conjunction with 

Earthwatch, will once again conduct an archaeologi- 
cal field school in the Klamath River Canyon. 

* Portland State University: For the second year, a three- 

week rock art field school will be conducted. Work 
will be concentrated in the Warner Valley area of the 
Lakeview Resource Area. 

The cost to the District for the five field schools is 
estimated to be $40,000, with the accomplished work 
valued in excess of $250,000 making the program 
beneficial to all participants. 

Although not funded in FY94, archaeological training for 
public school teachers will continue to the extent possible. 
This will be the third year of the program that has resulted 
in over 20 teachers receiving hands-on training in 
archaeological survey, excavation, lab work, ethnography, 
and interaction with living Indian Peoples. 



'94 Program Plans 



Fire/Aviation 



The BLM's fire and aviation programs are important 
support programs. Fire management has two major focus 
programs, suppressing wild fires and conducting pre- 
scribed bums to benefit wildlife and range management 
(as well as other programs.) The aviation program 
supports various activities including firefighting, and wild 
horse and wildlife census surveys. 

'92 Program Accomplishments 



In FY94 the BLM anticipates participating in five 
archaeological field school programs as follows. 



* Responded to all reported wildfires. 

* Supported the range and wildlife management programs 

in planning and implementing prescribed burns. 

= 11 



* Participated in interagency fire prevention program with 
students. 



'94 Program Plans 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Will continue to process fuelwood sales on an as-needed 
basis. 



* Completed a prescribed burn in the Shaw area. 

* Completed the budget and local operations policies for 

the Fire Management Activity Plan. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Preparations are being made for at least one prescribed 

burn in the Lakeview Resource Area. 

* Possibility for one Fire Management Plan in the 

Lakeview Resource Area. 



Hazardous Materials 
Management 



Protecting public health and safety and the environment is 
the priority of the hazardous materials management 
program. A major part of the program is the investigation 
and cleanup of public land sites contaminated with 
hazardous materials in conformance with federal and state 
laws. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



Forestry 



The forestry program in the Lakeview Resource Area is 
almost solely limited to sales of fuelwood. The objective 
of the program is to meet the public's demand for fuel- 
wood without negative impacts to other resource values. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 

* Completed an environmental assessment for cutting of 

fuelwoods and boughs within the Lakeview Resource 
Area. 

* Two new fuelwood cutting areas were cleared for 

cutting. 

* Two bough cutting areas were cleared. 

* Four firewood permits were completed. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 

* Continued to process fuelwood sales. 



* Requested funding to survey hazardous well locations 

on public lands within the district. 

* Closed two homestead wells near the Ft. Rock area and 

two wells located elsewhere in the district. 

* Provided a temporary appointment to fill haz-mat 

coordinator position and bring the district into 
compliance with haz-mat laws and regulations. 

* Conducted a follow-up survey with the U.S. Air Force 

on Keno Dump site clean up. 

* Completed a follow-up on Bly dump compliance audit. 

* Continued checking on unauthorized dumping activities 

on public lands. 

* Updated contingency plan for the district. 

* Completed the closure of four underground storage 

tanks in the district warehouse complex in Lakeview. 

* Ordered and received new above-ground fueling station 

that conforms to all state laws and regulations. 

* Proposed that districts use waste oil as a fuel source for 

waste oil burning heater system as a means of 
reducing hazardous waste generation. 



12 



* Completed the Oregon Department of Environmental 
Quality compliance status for the district concerning 
hazardous waste reduction activities. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Conducted Level I hazardous material review for 

approximately 2,000 acres of public land that was put 
up for sale and/or exchange by the Lakeview Re- 
source Area. 

* Coordinated with Oregon Department of Environmental 

Quality at Alkali Lake on drilling of new monitoring 
wells, vegetation collection samples, and the securing 
of the site. 

* Continued inventoring BLM-administered lands in the 

Lakeview District for unauthorized dumping of 
hazardous and toxic materials. Three household sites 
discovered and are currently pending clean up; no 
hazardous or toxic materials were involved. 

* Continued inventory of existing homestead well sites in 

the Ft. Rock area - 14 additional wells were located 
with four sites enclosed in cement. 

* Emergency clean up at a Summer Lakes site due to a 

small unidentified burn. 



'94 Program Plans 



With an anticipated reduction in funds, the hazardous 
material program will be prioritizing tasks and using all 
levels of expertise to continue ongoing studies. 



Lands and Realty 



The lands and realty programs complete land actions in 
support of BLM resource management programs and autho- 
rizes public land uses by the public sector. These actions 
could include specific land use authorizations, direct land 
sales, land acquisitions, and control of unauthorized use and 
occupancy. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 

* Rights-of-Way: Five units were completed; Lake 

County Road Department were granted four, and PTC 
Amendment (Slater Communications) was granted 
one. 

* Compliance: Nine units were completed; Lake County 

Road Department received seven, and one each to 
BPA Compensation Station and Kohfield Access 
Road. 

* Rights-of-Way Relinquished: Murphy Access Road. 

* Permits/Leases: Two permits were renewed; Fine 

Haystack Yard and Flynn Haystack Yard. 

* Permits/Leases Relinquished: Lasich Haystack Yard. 

* Sales: John Pettus (40 acres), Herb Vloedman (80 

acres), and Gene Porter (241.26 acres). 

* Twenty six sale information requests were responded to 

throughout the year. Of those, three proposals 
required preliminary staff reviews resulting in 
rejection due to resource/planning related conflicts. 

* Lynch Brothers Exchange: All necessary field/inven- 

tory reports were completed including the Federal 
Register and newspaper publications for the exchange 
as it currently exists. The exchange has been pending 
due to a private exchange between Lynch/Flynn to 
clean up lands initially rejected by the resource area 
because of the isolated nature of the parcels. Lynch 
has recently informed the area manager that his 
private exchange with Flynn has been consummated 
and he expects to resume processing the BLM 
exchange this fall. 

* State Exchange (Warner Valley): This exchange is 

pending the outcome of a BLM/Slate cultural 
protection issue. The 1993 budget directives recom- 
mended postponement of exchange processing until 
this matter is cleared up. 

* The M. Cahill exchange is currently pending $50,000 

worth of cultural mitigation. Since the chances of 
funding for such mitigation is remote, closure of this 
case is recommended. 

* The Foster Exchange agreement has been signed and is 

pending due to conflict with Wilderness Study Area 
(WSA), Interim Management Plan (IMP) regula- 
tions. This case isn't serialized and will not be 
pursued until a Congressional decision on wilderness 
suitability of the Diablo WSA is made. 

^^ 13 



* Two exchange proposals from DeSena and Dave Elder 
were received and reviewed by the area staff. These 
exchanges were rejected due to a lack of significant 
resource values. Other exchange discussions have 
occurred between the resource area, the new owners 
of the Valmont property, John Kiely, and Bill Hank. 
To date no formal proposals have been received on 
these. 



Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) for signature; 
RE-L-127 will probably be sent to DSL by the end of 
September for signature. Actual recording of the 
preceeding easements will not occur until FY94. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Trespass cases: Wagner Agricultural/Occupancy 

Trespass (case is closed, however a coordination is 
still needed for the public land fence relocation); 
Bark's Occupancy Trespass (resolved and case file 
closed); and the Wheeler Agricultural/Occupancy 
Trespass (settlement payment has been received, and 
the case closed). 

* Acquisitions: Kiely Brothers Ranch had an estimated 

title transfer date of early FY93. Target acreage was 
adjusted downward from planned 3,590 to 2,451.24 
due to implications arising from the Congressionally 
mandated sale restoration plan; and Kaichen Dona- 
tion, which was rejected through staff review due to a 
lack of resource values relative to cost. 

* Appraisals: There were seven non-reportable units; 

Vloedman, Porter, and Pettus sales (Fair Market 
Value), and Fine, Lasich, and Flynn Permit (Fair 
Market Value Rental). 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Rights-of-Way: A total of 20 rights-of-way were 

issued, of which 1 3 were new and seven were 
amendments. 

* Permits/Leases: One occupancy permit was renewed. 

* Trespass: One trespass (occupancy) was completed and 

closed. 

* Federal Land Policy & Management Act (FLPMA) 

Sales: To date there have been six parcels of public 
land in the Fort Rock/Christmas Valley areas 
(totaling 2,776 acres) that have completed the 
processing phase. 

* Exchanges: No exchanges were processed to comple- 

tion. 

* Acquisitions: The Kiely acquisition, totaling 2,451.21 

acres, was consumated by the resource area. 

* Easement Acquisitions: RE-6-126 is currently at the 



* Rights-of-Way: Eight are anticipated for issuance. 

* Permits/Leases: Two permits are anticipated to be 

renewed. 

* Trespass: One trespass (unlawful use) is anticipated for 

completion and closure. 

* FLPMA Sales: The resource area anticipates offering 

2,200 acres of public land for sale in the Plush, 
Oregon area. 

* Exchanges: The Lynch Brothers exchange (offered land 

3,656.09 acres and selected land 4,790.44 acres) is 
anticipated for completion. 

* Acquisitions: No acquisitions are anticipated. 

* Easement Acquisitions: The resource area anticipates 

the submission of RE-L-128 and RE-L-129 to DSL 
for signature. 



Law Enforcement 



In December 1992, a new ranger was hired for the 
Lakeview District and relocated the headquarters to the 
Lakeview District office. The District Ranger divides his 
patrol and investigation time between the Lakeview and 
Klamath Falls Resource Areas. The major emphasis has 
been, and will continue to be, the coordination of efforts 
with local law enforcement agencies, the prevention of 
cultural and archaeological resource destruction, and 
theft and destruction of public property. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Considerable law enforcement work was accomplished 

in the Fort Rock area to stem some of the vandalism 
and unintentional trespass. 

* Participated in an multi-agency anti-vandalism task 

force patrols in Lake County. 



14 



* Participated in a multi-agency, ARPA (Archaeological 

Resources Protection Act of 1979) Task Force in 
Lakeview District, coordinated by BLM Special 
Agents. 

* Assisted Oregon State Office Special Agents serve 

arrest-search warrants in Lake County based on an 
undercover operation carried out by BLM Special 
Agents. 

* Participated in a joint law enforcement effort with 

Klamath County Sheriffs office to increase patrols 
and place a special emphasis on reducing law 
enforcements incidents at Topsy Campground, and 
the Klamath River Put-In sites. 

* Negotiated contract with "Klamath County 911" 

dispatch to provide law enforcement dispatching and 
after hours emergency radio contact for BLM 
employees. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 

* Completed compliance inventory reports for the 

sunstone collection area. 

* Performed approximately 40 random mining claim 

notice checks in the sunstone and Coyote Hills areas. 

* Completed one random stone sale. 

* Completed four over-the-counter sales of gravel. 

* Completed one free-use permit. 

* Completed 16 gravel pit compliance checks. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 



'94 Program Plans 



* Update and complete the Lakeview District Law 

Enforcement Plan. 

* Reinstate Law Enforcement Agreement with Lake 

County, with special emphasis on anti-vandalism 
patrols in North Lake County. 

* Participate in multi-agency, anti-vandalism task force 

assignment at various locations in Lake and Klamath 
County, coordinated by the Oregon State Police. 

* Assist Oregon Suite Police to enforce wildlife closure 

areas in the Lakeview and Klamath Falls Resource 
Areas. 

* Participate in multi-agency task force assignments in Lake 

and Klamath County pertaining to forest products. 



Minerals 



The Lakeview and Klamath Falls Resource Areas 
minerals program focuses on administration of mining 
claims, mainly for sunstones; leasable minerals such as 
sodium and geothermal resources; and saleable minerals, 
such as sand and gravel on public lands. 



* Mineral potential examinations and reports were 

completed in FY93 for the Wood River Ranch 
acquisition, the Fort Rock/Christmas Valley and 
Naylox Mountain proposed public sales, and the 
proposed Lynch Brothers/BLM exchange. 

* Lakeview District minerals work on the Winema and 

Fremont National Forests included leasable mineral 
evaluations for four proposed exchanges. Geological 
assessments for three wild and scenic river studies on 
the Fremont National Forest were also completed. 

* Thirty-two mining claim notices were received and 

acknowledged. One mining plan of operations was 
also approved. Forty-four compliance examinations 
were conducted. 

* Final compliance on the Abert Lake sodium prospecting 

permit applications was completed, and preference 
right lease applications were filed. 

* A total of 1,600 cubic yards of sand, gravel, and other 

rock was produced from 12 sales. Seventeen 
compliance examinations were conducted. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Mineral potential reports arc anticipated for three land 
exchanges. In addition, it is projected that geological 
assessments will be done on at least three wild and 
scenic river studies. 



15 



* The mining claim notice and plan activity level is 

expected to increase. Mineral material disposals are 
expected to remain about the same. 

* An excess acreage determination and an economic 

analysis of the Abert Lake sodium lease applications, 
and minerals input for the Abert proposed ACEC, are 
scheduled for FY94. 



Range and Noxious Weed 
Management 



* Brim Fence - Constructed two miles of three-strand 

fence to create a new pasture for improved livestock 
management in the ZX Christmas Lake allotment. 

* Boundary Spring - Reconstructed an existing spring 

development in the Upper Bridge Creek allotment to 
improve flow and water storage. 

* Began work on a study to assess seeding native grasses 

to rehabilitate rangeland dominated by shrubs and 
annual grasses. 

* Continued to administer a noxious weeds spraying 

contract with Lake County. 



The Lakeview Resource Area's range management 
program administers livestock grazing activities on about 
3.2 million acres of land in Lake and Harney Counties. 
Each year grazing licenses authorizing animal unit 
months (AUMs) are issued for 127 public land allotments. 
A percentage of the grazing fees collected goes into the 
U.S. Treasury, but most is returned to the county or 
district to be used for range improvement projects 
designed to benefit wildlife and watershed resources 
while improving conditions for livestock grazing. 

The range program also collects inventory data and 
monitors range conditions on public lands. Information 
on vegetation utilization levels and trend are collected and 
evaluated to determine whether allotment goals and 
objectives are being met. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 

* Allotment management plans were completed for the 

Abert Seeding and Silver Creek allotments. 

* Allotment evaluations were completed on the following 

allotments: Hickey Individual, Sagehen, Schadler, 
Fisher Lake, Hickey, Paisley Flat, XL, North Blue- 
joint, Coyote-Colvin, Silver-Bridge Creek, Murdock, 
Oatman Flat, South Poverty, and Hogback Butte. 

* Monitored 75 allotments. 

* East Jug Fence: Built two miles of three-strand barbed 

wire fence to improve livestock distribution. 

* East Jug Southwest Pasture Pipeline Extension. 

* Roger's Fence - Created an individual use area within 

the Greaser Drift allotment as mitigation for the Deep 
Creek riparian exclosure. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Developed three Allotment Management Plans (AMP): 

Rosebud allotment in conjunction with wildlife 
Habitat Management Plan (HMP) for the area; East 
Green Mountain AMP; and O'Keeffe Individual. 

* Collected monitoring data on 84 I and M category 

allotments. 

* Allotment evaluations were completed on eight allot- 

ments; Crump Individual, Lane Plan II, Corn Lake, 
Rabbit Basin, South Rabbit Hills, East Rabbit Hills, 
North Rabbit Hills, and Ward Lake. 

* Administered grazing permits and issued billings. 

* Completed a minimum of 225 use supervison visits to 

125 allotments, concentrating on I and M category 
allotments and riparian areas. 

* Continued weed control program with Lake County 

Weed Board. 

* Maintained five cattleguards. 

* Completed juniper cutting at Duncan (90 acres) and 

Round Mountain (100 areas). 

* Conducted prescribed burns at Hill Camp (6,000 acres), 

Buck Creek (400 acres), and Shaw (600 acres). 

* Built fencing at Seeding (three miles), Indian Skull (two 

miles), Middle Abert (1 1/2 miles), Duncan, and 
Horse Creek. 

* Turpin: Constructed a well (mitigation for Warner 

Wetland livestock exclosure area), installed one 
cattleguard (to exclude livestock from the core area 



16 



of the Warner Wetlands ACEC), and constructed 
about 5 miles of three-strand barbed wire fence (to 
serve as allotment boundary.) 

* Constructed a pipeline at Coglan Butte. 

* Completed weed control at Willow Creek (40 acres.) 

* Maintained roads at Fredericks Butte 6121 (36 miles); 

West Beaty Butte 6176-1 (29 miles); Alkali Lake 
6184 (28 miles); Hill Camp 6102 (16 miles); Poverty 
Basin 6164 (32 miles); Herder Spring 6107 (6 miles); 
Murdock Well 6107-b (2 miles); Pitcher Ranch 6127 
(6 miles); Mud Lake 6152 (10 miles); and Spalding 
Reservoir 6167-lm (6 miles). 

* Maintained Spalding Reservoir Spillway. 

* Ceres Flat: Installed two cattleguards (to reduce the 

safety hazard on Highway 31 from cattle drifting onto 
the road) and constructed eight miles of three-strand 
barbed wire fence to implement a grazing system and 
improve management in a post burn area. 

*Beaty Butte Spring Exclosures: Continued the project to 
protect springs in cooperation with Oregon Depart- 
ment of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW.) 

* Mac: Constructed two miles of three-strand barbed 

wire fence to implement a grazing system (will also 
help improve management on recent burn area), and 
installed one cattleguard. 



* Round Mountain juniper: Carry over project from 

FY93, cut juniper on 150 acres near Long Canyon at 
Round Mountain. 

* North Flagstaff fence and cattleguard: Continue 

construction of fencing to exclude cattle from the 
Warner Lakes ACEC. 

* Flagstaff Well: Provide water for livestock excluded 

from Warner Lakes ACEC. 

* West Bluejoint: Construct four miles of three-strand 

barbed wire fence to complete grazing allotment 
boundary and improve grazing management . 



Recreation Resources 



Public lands in the Lakeview District offer a wide variety 
of recreation opportunities. The program strives to 
provide quality recreation while protecting sensitive 
resources, expanding visitor services and interpretation, 
and enhancing outdoor recreation through partnerships. 
Initiatives such as Back County Byways and Watchable 
Wildlife provide focus and funding to increase recreation 
opportunities. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



'94 Program Plans 



* Duncan juniper cut: Carry over project from FY92 and 

'93 (this is an riparian project) concentrating on 
juniper removal in riparian/Aspen stands on about 90 
acres in Silver Lake area. 

* Indian Skull fence: Continuation of project from FY92, 

1.5 miles of three-strand fence to improve grazing 
management along Highway 31. 

* Beaty Butte Exclosures: Continuation of an riparian 

project to exclude cattle from spring sites, and 
provide water outside of associated riparian areas. 

* Turpin pipeline and troughs: Provision for livestock 

water outside the Wamer Lakes ACEC core area. 

* Waterhole Spillway and dam repair: Repair four 

rcteniion/spillway structure damaged by run-off 
during spring of '93. 



* Installed two Romtec toilets, parking area, and split 

rail fence at Hart Bar. 

* Constructed the Abert Lake Watchable Wildlife Site 

and rest stop (viewing pad and two interpretive 
signs). 

* Constructed Doherty Slide Hang Gliding Site with 

assistance from the Rogue Valley Hand Gliders, and 
installed signs and register box. 

* Completed Paisley kiosk sign in cooperation with the 

U.S. Forest Service and ODFW. 

* Initiated use of trailer-mounted portable toilets, which 

were used for Memorial Day weekend at the Sand 
Dunes, Elderhostel, Career Camp, and several busy 
hang gliding weekends. 

* Received Back Country Byway kiosks for Christmas 

Valley. 



17 



* Memorandum Of Understanding signed with private 

landowner for Christmas Valley Back Country 
Byway kiosk placement. 

* Permanent recreation technician added to staff in May. 

* Excess vehicle trails blocked and a foot trail built to 

Oregon's largest juniper tree in the Lost Forest with 
assistance from the Pacific Northwest 4WD Associa- 
tion. 

* Contributed to Lake County Welcome Center display. 

* Installed interpretive sign, landscaped, and upgraded at 

Highway Well Rest Area. 

* Visitor register boxes installed at Doherty Slide and 

Crack-in-the-Ground. 

* Field presentation at Career Camp in the Warner 

Wetlands. 

* Presentation to North Lake County fifth grade on 

vandalism. 

* Continued placing boundary signs at access points. 

* Access Means Freedom presentation at Oregon BLM 

wilderness conference. 

* Constructed Hart Bar Trail and installed a sign. 

* Installed Portal signs. 

* Upgraded Sunstone Recreation Site facilities. 

* Improved access for physically disadvantaged at Duncan 

Reservoir, Fort Rock, and Crack-in-the-Ground facili- 
ties. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Twelve historic homestead wells were cased to protect 

the environment and to comply with Oregon State 
regulations. 

* The Warner Wetland ACEC visitor contact site at Hart 

Bar was completed. The area now has a trail with 
three shaded interpretive displays. In addition, a trail 
and photo blind were constructed. The site was 
specifically designed to be accessible to people with 
disabilities. 



* Advance planning was completed for a visitor interpre- 

tive trail that provides an excellent overlook of the 
Warner Wetlands ACEC, and for a nature trail at 
Swamp/Mugwump Lakes in the Warner Wetlands. 

* The National Watchable Wildlife program provided an 

additional interpretive panel for the Lake Abert pull- 
off. Also an Intermoble Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act (ISTEA) grant application was 
approved for planning and site landscaping on the 
Lake Abert Scenic corridor. A vault toilet has arrived 
to be built in 1994, and the site preparation was 
finished with the completion of the environmental 
assessment. 

* A Youth Conservation Corp crew accomplished major site 

grooming and refurbishing at the Highway Well Rest 
Area. The facilities were freshly painted and a new roof 
was put on the shade structure. New wheelchair- 
accessible picnic tables have replaced the old tables. 
The toilets are now wheelchair-accessible. Two inter- 
pretive signs were repaired and repainted. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Visitor facilities will continue to be expanded at the 

Warner Wetlands. This will consist of building the 
Warner Wetlands Overlook to include parking and an 
interpretive trail, design and construction of a 20 unit 
campground at Campbell Lake, and the development 
of a site plan for the Swamp/Mugwump nature study 
trail. 

* Design and preparation of contract drawing for a 

modem toilet at the Highway Well Rest Area. 
Contract to be issued in FY95. The contract will also 
include major landscaping, native plantings, and 
noxious weed signs interpretive trail. 

* Installation of two kiosks on the Christmas Valley 

National Back Country Byway. 

* Retrofitting the toilet at the sunstone (Oregon's state 

gemstone) public collection area and marking the 
boundaries for easy public identification. 

* The upgrading of two miles of the road into the Lost 

Forest ACEC. 

* The planning for closing the "way" into the Crack-in- 

the-Ground and Derrick Cave in north Lake County. 
Interpretive panels will be designed and installed at 
both of these sites. 



18 



* The installation of a toilet at the Lake Abert National 
Watchable Wildlife site. 



Riparian/Wetland 
Management 



The Lakeview Resource Area is responsible for the care 
of about 100,000 acres of wetlands and 131 stream miles 
of riparian habitat. In 1989 the Warner Lakes Plan 
Amendment for Wetlands and Associated Uplands was 
completed. Subsequent activity plans have since been 
finished which address specific management actions in 
the Warner Wetlands. The major emphasis of these 
programs is now to implement those plans and to continue 
to inventory the ecological conditions of riparian corri- 
dors, develop or revise grazing, wildlife and related 
activity plans within priority habitats, and monitoring 
management actions across the resource area. 

The riparian and wetland management programs do not 
have individual funding accounts and is funded through a 
combination of range, wildlife, and watershed monies. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



* North American Wetlands Conservation Council Grant 

- approximately 25 miles of dike completely rebuilt 
and another six to eight miles repaired; 48 water 
control structures replaced, rebuilt, or repaired; 
approximately 300,000 yards of on-site material 
moved, shaped, and packed; approximately 100,000 
yards of rock and gravel used in setting headgates, 
capping roads, and reinforcing dikes. 

* Irrigation Well - meetings were held, agreements were 

reached and prepared but unsigned, solicitor con- 
tacted, etc. regarding water rights protests; well 
contract out for bid (twice); project not completed 
due to lack of funds and unresolved protests. 

* Lake Abert (The Nature Conservancy [TNC] contract) - 

continuation of on-going snowy plover work; 
coordinated with BLM inventory for first time; TNC 
has completed work and will be submitting final 
report late October; all funds obligated and just 
awaiting an invoice. 

* BLM Inventory - original plans for habitat condition 

inventory was postponed due to continuing drought. 
A weekly inventory of total waterfowl/waterbird 



population at Abert Lake was done instead, providing 
more useful data than the originally planned inven- 
tory (copy available upon request). 

* Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)/U.S. 

Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Coordination - 
Southeast Oregon breeding waterfowl aerial census 
plans mostly complete (Summer Lake Wetlands 
Management Area, Malheur National Wildlife 
Refuge [NWR], Klamath Forest NWR, Warner 
Wetlands, Goose Lake Valley primary areas), BLM/ 
ODFW/USFWS/Ducks Unlimited main players; 
Intermountain West Concept Plan (precursor to a 
Joint Venture Plan) still not out for review but soon, 
planned FY92 workload for this didn't happen, 
should in FY93; Oregon duck banding project well 
underway, worked with ODFW as Warner Wetlands 
not very wet, everything in place to begin there when 
it gets wet. 

* Lake Abert ACEC Nominations - analysis of impor- 

tance and relevence with respect to wildlife resources 
completed, with copies provided to the Area Manager 
and the Planning & Environmental Coordinator 
(available upon request.) 

* Miscellaneous - one week detail to Colorado for review 

of wetlands program in Alamosa Resource Area.; 
Warner Wetlands Monitoring Plan completed; 
volunteer project, ODFW project; filmed Oregon 
Field Guide segment; River's End Ranch project 
coordination. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* West Fork Silver Creek: Recreation and cattle use 

concentrated along the West Fork of Silver Creek is 
impacting the riparian areas and causing increased 
erosion. Also, beaver activity in the creek is chang- 
ing water flow patterns and causing a roadway to 
erode. This project uses fencing to direct recreation 
and cattle use off the fragile riparian area and a small 
culvert will be placed in the road to keep water 
moving in its natural channel. 

* Dick Creek: Fencing constructed along Dick Creek will 

control livestock grazing in the riparian zone and 
create a manageable riparian pasture. 

* Horse Creek Fence: Construction of fencing has 

allowed management of grazing on three miles of 
Horse Creek. The portion of the stream that has been 
fenced is in fair to poor condition from years of late 
season use. Improvement in riparian condition and 



19 



stream function will provide benefits to a threatened 
fisheries downstream. 

* Duncan Fence: A fence was constructed to exclude 

livestock from a fishing reservoir and to improve 
grazing management along 2.5 miles of stream and in 
nearby aspen stands and wetlands. 

* Boundary Fence: Fencing to implement the Warner 

Wetlands HMP and AMP. 

* Warner Well: Completed drilling of a well in the 

Warner Wetlands for habitat restoration and enhance- 
ment. The North American Wetlands Conservation 
Fund contributed $54,000 to the cost of this project. 

* Continued an inventory and classification of spring and 

aspen areas in the Lakeview Resource Area to 
determine the condition and potential of these sites 
and to prescribe management actions and projects. 

* Prepared the Rosebud-Edmonds Well Habitat Manage- 

ment Plan. This is a restoration and enhancement 
project involving a variety of land management 
agencies and organizations. Participants include the 
BLM, ODFW, Ducks Unlimited, Oregon Waterfowl 
and Wetlands Association, Farmer's Home Adminis- 
tration, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation 
Service and three private landowners. The plan area 
encompasses approximately 15,000 acres of inter- 
mingled Federal, State, and private lands along the 
northeastern portion of ODFW's Summer Lake 
Wildlife Management Area. 

* Continued a Challenge Cost Share inventory project 

with ODFW to gather information on Lake Abert's 
aquatic ecology. This inventory will assist BLM in 
determining potential impacts to that ecosystem from 
two major development proposals (a hydropower 
project and sodium mining operation). 

*Maintained eight riparian-wetland improvement pro- 
jects, including the Warner Wetlands irrigation 
system, which is critical to implementation of the 
Warner Wetlands ACEC Plan, HMP and AMP. 

* Monitored four HMPs: Warner Wetlands, Southern 

Warner, Warner Lakes, and the High Desert Aquatic. 

* Water rights were pursued for spring and reservoir 

developments, which are critical to the success of 
grazing systems and provide livestock and wildlife 
water away from riparian and wetland areas. Secur- 
ing these water rights ensures continued use of these 
water sources. 



* Two ACEC nominations for Lake Abert have been 

received by the BLM, one from ODFW and the other 
from the Oregon Waterfowl and Wetlands Associa- 
tion. The nominations are based on Lake Abert's 
regional and Pacific Flyway importance to migrating 
waterfowl and waterbirds; the habitat it provides for 
three candidate and two listed threatened species; and 
the unique and irreplaceable aquatic ecology that 
provides the food base for the migrant birds. 

* Conducted monthly inventories of the western snowy 

plover nesting population using Lake Abert and 
weekly counts of the total waterfowl/waterbird 
population to determine species composition changes 
throughout the year. 

* Lakeview Districtpersonnel participated in a Career Camp 

for high school students from around the state. Riparian 
area and watershed management were topics discussed 
in the classroom and during a day-long field trip. 



'94 Program Plans 



The Lakeview Resource Area will place emphasis on 
water quality and riparian area monitoring, riparian/ 
watershed/water quality improvement projects, nonpoint 
source pollution control and water rights documentation. 
Range, wildlife, and riparian-wetland projects will 
support BLM's and the State of Oregon's efforts to protect 
water quality under the Clean Water Act and implementa- 
tion of BLM's Riparian-Wetland Initiative for the 1990s. 



* A water use inventory will continue to document all 

water developments in the Lakeview Resource Area 
and complete water rights documentation with the 
State of Oregon. 

* Water quality and macroinvertebrate sampling and 

analysis will continue to be conducted on streams 
throughout the resource area. Results of this moni- 
toring will be used to assess existing water quality 
and determine whether district land management 
activities result in any trends in water quality or 
stream condition. 

* The northern Lake County portion of the Lakeview 

Resource Area will have an Ecological Site Inventory 
initiated. This inventory, performed in cooperation 
with the Soil Conservation Service, gathers informa- 
tion about soil and vegetation conditions on BLM- 
administered lands. Information gathered in this 
inventory is indispensable in making resource 
management decisions. 



20 



*Round Mountain Juniper Control: Juniper is to be cut 
from around spring areas, streams, and aspen groves 
to release riparian vegetation and improve watershed 
conditions. 



conducted in partnership with The Nature Conser- 
vancy. Spotted frog inventory will be in partnership 
with The Nature Conservancy, ODFW, the Winema 
National Forest and the National Park Service. 



* Duncan Juniper Management: Invasive juniper will be 

treated to improve watershed conditions and reduce 
competition for moisture around seeps, streams, and 
aspen areas. Several aspen stands have been declin- 
ing due to increased competition from juniper. 

* Beaty Butte Exclosures: 19 exclosures will be con- 

structed around spring sources and out flows to 
improve riparian conditions. This project is being 
completed in cooperation with ODFW, who will 
provide materials, and the MC Ranch, who will 
maintain the fences. 

* Wetland Habitat Enhancement: Restoration and habitat 

enhancement work is planned to benefit riparian- 
dependent and sensitive bird species. These include 
black terns, white-faced ibis, yellow rail, greater 
sandhill crane, Forster's tern, lesser scaup, ring- 
necked duck, long-billed curlew, western least 
bittern, marsh wren, sora, Virginia rail, eared grebe, 
and great egret. 

Projects include: prescribed burning; blasting; dike 
installation, repair and maintenance; water control 
structure installation, repair and maintenance; 
installation of culverts; protective fence installation 
and repair; construction of nesting islands and other 
structures; retrofitting of an artesian well; and ditch 
cleaning. 

Project work is planned in accordance with the 
Warner Wetlands, Rosebud/Edmonds Well and South 
Warner HMPs and the Warner Wetlands ACEC Plan 
and Allotment Management Plan. ODFW, the 
Oregon Waterfowl and Wetland Association and two 
private landowners are cooperators for some of the 
restoration and enhancement projects. Monitoring 
studies will be conducted to assess the attainment of 
ACEC plan objectives and to monitor the success of 
grazing practices in the ACEC. Some fence removal 
and construction work will be conducted in partner- 
ship with the Eugene Chapter of the Isaak Walton 
League. 

* Aquatic and Riparian-Dependent Species Inventory and 

Monitoring: Surveys to inventory and monitor 
several important fish and wildlife species are 
planned, which include the short-nosed, Lost River, 
and Warner suckers, western snowy plover, red-band 
trout, spotted frog, slender sculpin, and the western 
pond turtle. Study of the Warner sucker will be 



* Foskett Dace Spring Rehabilitation: This spring area 

contains Foskett Dace, a listed fish species. Stream 
banks will be stabilized with erosion cloth and marsh 
habitat will be bumed to maintain a healthy ecosys- 
tem. 

* Deep Creek Projects: Fencing along Deep Creek will 

be constructed and maintained and a cattleguard 
installed in cooperation with the landowner and 
ODFW. This stream provides habitat for red-band 
trout. 100 acres of juniper will be managed to 
improve watershed, stream, and riparian conditions. 

* Bridge Creek: Two miles of Bridge Creek will be 

enclosed with protective fencing to improve stream 
and riparian conditions. 

* Fifteen Mile Creek: Exclosures along Fifteenmile 

Creek, a stream supporting Warner sucker habitat, 
will be reconstructed and completed. 

* Lake Abert: Inventory of the Lake Abert ecosystem 

will be continued in cooperation with ODFW and 
The Nature Conservancy. This inventory is a 
combination of two on-going efforts, monthly 
inventories of the western snowy plover nesting 
population using the lake (includes banding), and 
weekly counts of the total waterfowl-waterbird 
population to determine species composition changes 
throughout the year. The data gathered will be used 
in a comprehensive analysis of the potential environ- 
mental impacts of proposed development projects 
and an ACEC nomination for the lake. 

* Riparian-wetland areas will continue to be inventoried 

and monitored to determine progress towards 
achievement of proper functioning condition, assess 
effectiveness of management practices and meet the 
goals and objectives of BLM's Riparian-Wetland 
Initiative for the 1990s. 

* Numerious fencing projects will be maintained to 

continue management and protection of vital riparian- 
wetland resources. 

* The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 

(APHIS) conducts animal damage control on BLM- 
administered lands, and will be initiating NEPA 
analysis of its Animal Damage Control Program for 
its Roseburg District. This area encompasses private 
and federal lands in Klamath and Lake counties. 



21 



APHIS is the lead agency for this effort, and will be 
conducting its analysis in cooperation with the 
Lakeview Resource Area BLM and the Winema and 
Fremont National Forests. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Continued interim management on all wilderness study 
areas. 



Wilderness 



'94 Program Plans 



The wilderness program in the Lakeview Resource Area is 
now focused on interim management. In 1991, the BLM in 
Oregon completed the wilderness reporting process. As a 
part of this process recommendations on 12 wilderness study 
areas (WSAs) in the Lakeview Resource Area totalling 
423,270 acres were signed by the Secretary of the Interior 
and have been forwarded to the President. Until Congress 
acts on final designation of any of these areas as wilderness 
they will be managed so as not to impair their wilderness 
values. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



* Continue interim management on all WSAs. 



Wild Horses and Burros 



The focus of the wild horse and burro program in the 
Lakeview Resource Area is to manage two Wild Horse 
Herd Management Areas, which are located in the Paisley 
Desert and Beaty Butte. The goal of the program is to 
manage these areas to maintain the natural habitat in a 
thriving ecological balance. 



* Interim Management Plan (IMP) patrols began in March 

and all units were covered through the season. 

* New signs were placed at various locations. 

* The Wilderness Study report was issued in October, 

with copies available upon request. 

* A presentation was given at the Annual Wilderness 

Conference on disabled access to wilderness; other 
districts will provide more information to produce 
statewide brochure. 

* Provided input on monitoring studies to be established 

in WSAs. 

* Assisted in meetings and field inspection of the Squaw 

Ridge fire. 

* Reviewed proposal for change of grazing north end of 

Devils Garden and removal of fence. 

* Reviewed range allotment evaluations. 

* Assisted on Sweeney Canyon juniper watershed project. 

* Completed monthly monitoring inspections of all 

wilderness study areas. 



'92 Program Accomplishments 



The Paisley and Beaty Butte Herd Management Areas 
were gathered in the fall of 1992. The table on the next 
page shows minimum and maximum numbers for each 
herd area, growth of each herd area since the last gathers 
in 1987/88, and current wild horse numbers in each area. 

A fertility study initiated in January 1986 on the Beaty 
Butte Herd Management Area was completed in Decem- 
ber of 1990. Results indicated that some reduction 
occurred in foaling when dominant stallions of a band are 
vasectomized. More information can be obtained by 
contacting Bob Bolton at 503-947-2177. 



Wildlife and Fisheries 



The wildlife and fisheries program ensures that fish, 
wildlife, and special status species habitats are protected 
in the operation of the BLM's multiple use programs. 
This is achieved by conducting habitat and animal surveys 
on public lands, developing habitat management plans 
and other special purpose plans to ensure protection of 
critical wildlife values, designing habitat enhancement 
projects, and monitoring of wildlife and other program 
activities to determine their effectiveness. 



22 





PAISLEY HERD AREA 


BEATY BUTTE HERD AREA 




MINIMUM ANIMALS = 60 


MINIMUM ANIMALS= 100 




MAXIMUM ANIMALS = 110 


MAXIMUM ANIMALS = 250 




# OF HORSES % INCREASE 


# OF HORSES % INCREASE 


YEAR 


ADULTS(FOALS) OR Decrease 


ADULTS(FOALS) OR DECREASE 


1988 


31(9) 


260(42) GATHER 


1989 


59(13) +48(+31) 


101(49) 


1990 


88(11) +33(-15) 


129(25) +22(-49) 


1991 


143(26) +39(+58) 


191(59) +33(+58) 


1992 


169(34) +15(+24) 


250(62) +24(+5) 


1993 


64(0) GATHER 


110(16) GATHER 



'92 Program Accomplishments 

* Cooperated with the ongoing southeastern Oregon elk 

collaring/telemetry study. Attended meetings with 
ODFW and U.S. Forest Service and received 1992 
progress and 1993 (final year of study) strategy. 

* Cooperated with the Peregrine Falcon Reintroduction 

Program. Visited Crump Lake hack sites before and 
after bird release. Requested annual progress report. 

* Provided input for ODFW's Request for Information on 

the status of the western sage grouse habitats in the 
Lakeview Resource Area. 

* Completed a volunteer project with the Isaac Walton 

group out of Eugene at Coglan Canyon to exclude 
2,000 acres of bighorn sheep habitat from livestock 
grazing. 

* Attended bitterbrush/mountain mahogany working 

group meetings to develop a multi-agency plan for 
rehabilitating winter range in north Lake County. 

* Coordinated with ODFW the construction of a bighorn 

sheep guzzler outside Orejana Canyon WSA. 

* Cooperated with ODFW duck and goose banding in 

Goose Lake Valley. 

* Hauled water to critical bighorn sheep guzzlers in the 

Coglan Buttes. 

* Performed maintenance on big game guzzlers in the 

resource area in coordination with ODFW to elimi- 
nate duplication. 



* Cooperated with Jack Hodnet, a government trapper, 

and attended Animal Damage Control (ADC)/ Animal 
and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) 
meetings affecting the resource area. 

* Attended field tours with ODFW and Lakeview BLM 

staff personnel (range, botany, fire, lands, etc.) to 
clear for project work and disposal and provide input 
to AMPs and evaluations (HMP monitoring - two 
units.) 

* Toured north Lake County for potential sites for 

prescribed fire/juniper thinning projects and analyzed 
previous prescribed fire projects for widlife benefits. 

* Developed well in the Devils Garden WSA with 

combined funds from BLM and the Rocky Mountain 
Elk Foundation to provide permanent water for the 
expanding north Lake County elk herd. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Initiated a cooperative project with the U.S. Fish & 
Wildlife Service, the Nature Conservancy, and the 
Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife to study life 
history/habitat requirements of the threatened Warner 
sucker. 



'94 Program Plans 

* Continue the study of the threatened Warner sucker. 



23 



1993 Lakeview Resource Area EA Register 

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that an environmental analysis of the potential effects be completed for 
any on-the-ground actions before their approval and that such analysis be open to the public. 

During fiscal year 1993 , the Lakeview Resource Area analyzed several proposed actions requiring the preparation of en vironmental 
assessments (EAs.) In addition, many proposed actions did not receive funding and have been put on hold or are planned for 
completion in fiscal year 1994. 

To receive a copy of an anvironmental assessment, please submit a written request to the district office, identifying the EA by 
register number and project name. Please let us know of your interest in an EA as early as possible to give the specialists time to 
fully consider any input. Contact Paul Whitman at (503) 947-6110 for further information. 



Area 

Register 

Number 


Project Name 


Proposed Action 


Location 


Affected 

Special 

Area 


Est. Completion 
Date and 
Project Leader 


010-02-31 


Ceres Flat 
ROW Fence 


Construct 4 miles of fence 
to improve grazing system. 




None 


1/21/93 

Dave Pacioretty 


015-03-01 


Spaulding Reserv. 
Spillway Repair 


Repair spillway. 


Beaty Butte 


Spaulding WSA 


Dick Mayberry 


015-03-02 


Evergreen Mtn. 
AMP 


AMP Implementation. 


Fort Rock 


Squaw Ridge & 
Lava Beds WSA 


1/21/93 

Sandra McGuinnes 


015-03-03 


Oil-Dri Claim 
Block A, C, and 
D 


Expand Diatomite mine 
in Christmas Valley. 


Christmas 

Valley 


None 


Ken Tillman 


015-03-04 


Loveless Timber 
Sale 


Selectively harvest 
250 million board feet 
of ponderosa pine on 
110 acres in Loveless 
Creek drainage of 
Lake County. 


20 miles north 
of Lakeview, 
cast of Highway 
395. 


Habitat for 
northern 
goshawk 
(FC2). 


Larry Frazier 


015-03-05 


Goose Lake 

Valley 

Reinterment 


Establish an area where 
remains of prehistoric 
Native Americans can 
be reinterred. 


20 miles SW of 
Lakeview, at the 
edge of Goose 
Lake Valley. 


None 


Bill Cannon 


015-03-06 


Dry Valley 
Pipeline 


Construct 14 miles of 
pipeline to provide year- 
round water for livestock 
and wildlife. 


Little Juniper 
Spring Allotment 
75 miles north 
of Lakeview. 


None 


Not Started 
Sandra McGuinnis 


015-03-07 


Bureau Motion 
Public Sale 


Sell isolated 40-acre tract 
of public land. 


Christmas 
Valley 


None 


6/3/93 

Dan Stewardson 


015-03-08 

24 


Bureau Motion 
Public Sale 


Sell approximately 2,700 
acres of public land to 
restore and maintain 
ownership ratio in 
Lake County. 


Adjacent to and 
within 5 miles 
of Fort Rock 


None 


6/18/93 

Dan Stewardson 



Area 

Register 

Number 


Project Name 


Proposed Action 


Location 


Affected 

Special 

Area 


Est. Completion 
Date and 
Project Leader 


015-03-09 


Clover Creek 
Riparian Pasture 
Fence 


Construct three miles of 
barbed wire fence to 
develop a grazing system 
to improve meadows, 
stream banks, and aspen 
stands. 


25 miles NE of 
Lakeview, east 
of Highway 395, 
and north of the 
Fremont National 
Forest. 


None 


Not Started 
Alan Munhall 


015-03-10 


Colvin Riparian 
Pasture Fence 


Construct 5.5 miles of 
barbed wire fence to 
initiate a grazing system 
to manage livestock 
grazing. 


35 miles north of 
Lakeview, on Abert 
Rim, four miles 
north of Fremont 
National Forest 
boundary. 


Abert Rim 
WSA (1-101) 


01/94 

Alan Munhall 


015-03-11 


Guano Riparian 
Pasture Fence 


Construct three miles of 
fence to manage livestock 
on Guano Creek and 
surrounding uplands. 


North of Highway 
140, South of the 
Hart Mountain 
Refuge along 
Guano Creek. 


Guano Creek 
WSA (01-132), 
Guano Creek & 
Sink Lake pro- 
posed RNA. 


On Hold 
Alan Munhall 


015-03-12 


North Bluejoint 
Winter Use 


Change the current cattle 
grazing use from spring 
to winter. 


20 miles north of 
Plush. 


5% of area lies 
within the Orijana 
Canyon WSA. 


On Hold 
Dave Pacioretty 


015-03-13 


White Hills 
Timber Sale 


Selectively harvest 100 
mbf of timber on 80 acres. 


55 miles NW of 
Lakeview. 


None 


Larry Frazier 


015-03-14 


Wagon Trail 
Permit 


Special recreation permit. 


Paisley to 
Summer Lake. 


Diablo WSA 




015-03-15 


Bighorn Sheep 
Guzzlers 


Construct guzzlers for 
bighorn sheep. 


Spaulding WSA 


Spaulding WSA 


8/25/93 
Vern Stofleth 


015-03-16 


South Butte 
Valley holding 
pen 


Construct holding pen. 


North Alkali Lake 


None 


4/26/93 
SandraMcGuinnis 



010-03-05 Abert Watchable 
Wildlife Program 

013-03-01 Lakeview RA 
Noxious Weed 
Control 



Construct vault toilet. 



Control noxious weeds 
using chemical and 
mechanical methods. 



Abert Lake near 
Juniper Creek 

Selected sites 
in Lakeview 
RA 



Abert Lake 
ACEC 

None 



9/02/93 

Doug Troutman 



Bob Bolton 



013-03-02 Animal Damage 
Control Program 



APHIS to conduct ADC 
on District. 



District-wide 



Diablo WSA 



9/30/93 



25 



LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA RPS UPDATE 



Section I - Grazing Use and Management Adjustments 



The following identifies and explains the changes made in allotment management since 1983 when the Record of Decision was 
issued. 



Allot. 
No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 

Allotment Categorization 



0103 



ZX-Christmas Lake 



While no brush control projects were proposed in the Land Use 
Plan, wildfires burned 8,448 acres in this 578,000 acre allotment. 



0104 



Bottomless Lake 



Use is currendy permitted on an annually authorized Temporary 
Nonrenewable license. No permanent allocation is 
anticipated. 



0201 



Vinyard Individual 



C Change from Maintain (M) to Improve (I) category for the 

following reasons: 

* Increasing juniper density is decreasing herbaceous 
component, increasing soil loss; 

* Ecological Site Inventory (ESI) indicates unsatisfactory 
condition; and 

* Significant opportunity to increase vegetative production. 
Fencing and spring development not proposed in the Land Use 
Plan were built to improve riparian areas by managing livestock 
use. 



0202 



Hickey Individual 



M The 0223 Hickey allotment is combined with 0202 Hickey 

Individual for better livestock management. Preference is 
combined for a total of 583 AUMs. 



0203 



O'Keefe 



Fence not proposed in Land Use Plan was built to improve 
riparian use management on Twentymile Creek. 



0205 



Greaser Drift 



M Additional two miles of fence and 283 acres of seeding were 

implemented to mitigate loss of livestock forage through exclu- 
sion on riparian areas. Change from I to M category because of 
increased production, decreased livestock conflicts. 



0207 



Lane Plan I 



M Fence not proposed in Land Use Plan built to improve riparian 

area along Twentymile Creek. 



0210 



Rim 



M Use adjusted from 91 to 49 AUMs active preference because 

a portion of the allotment was separated to form the 02 14 Chuckar 
Springs allotment. 



0211 



Round Mountain 



M Additional fence and waterhole developed for riparian area 

management. 



0212 



Rahilly-Gravelly 



Additional fence and spring development to manage livestock 
use on riparian areas. 



26 



Allot. 
No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 

Allotment Categorization 



0215 



Hill Camp 



M Prescribed burn developed to reach ecological condition objec- 

tives. 



0216 


O'Keefe Individual 


0217 


Cox Individual 


0218 


Sandy Seeding 


0222 


Fisher Lake 



0223 



0400 



0422 
0425 

0426 



0427 



Hickey 



Paisley Common 



0404 


Willow Creek 


M 


0409 


Tucker Hill 


M 


0412 


Fir Timber Butte 


M 


0419 


St. Patricks 


M 



Paisley Flat 
Pike Ranch 

Five Mile Butte 



XL 



0428 



Sheep Rock 



I Additional four miles of fence to manage grazing use on riparian 

areas. 

M Additional 74 AUMs allocated based on previously unallocated 

forage. 

M Additional 183 AUMs allocated based on 1993 evaluation report. 

M Additional 252 AUMs based on activating Suspended Nonuse 

from allotment 0208 Sagehen, and 1992 evaluation. 

C Combined with allotment 0202 Hickey Individual for improved 

livestock management. Additional fence and seeding a result of 
emergency fire rehabilitation. 

C Originally consisted of three use areas, the Coglan Hills, Abert 

Rim , and Diablo Peak. Abert Rim and Diablo Peak use areas are 
no longer allocated for use by livestock. 

Additional 126 AUMs allocated based on the change to percent 
public land in the allotment. 

Total preference transferred to 0427 XL allotment. No prefer- 
ence allocated to these lands. 



141 AUMs transferred to 0426 Five Mile Butte allotment. 

Additional 15 miles of fence due to Sharp Top Emergency Fire 
Rehabilitation. Preference allocated a result of the 1993 Paisley 
Agreement. 



M Preference allocated as a result of the 1993 Paisley Agreement. 

M Change from C to M management category because of snowy 

plover nesting habitat. 

I Additional 6.5 miles of fence; 2,500 acres of seeding; and 2,800 

acres of brush control are the result of the Sharp Top wildfire and 
rehabilitation. The additional 347 AUMs are from fire rehabili- 
tation seeding and Paisley Agreement. 

I The additional 9,180 acres of seeding and the 2,300 acres of brush 

control are a result of the Sharp Top wildfire and rehabilitation. 
The additional 690 AUMs are a result of the rehabilitation and 
Paisley Agreement. 

I The additional 3,010 acres of brush control not included in the 

land use plan are a result of wildfire. 



27 



Allot. 
No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 
Allotment Categorization 



0429 



Twin Lakes 



M An additional 4,776 acres of seeding and 550 acres of brush 

control are the result of the Sharp Top wildfire and rehabilitation. 
An additional 46 AUMs are allocated as a result of the rehabili- 
tation. Change from I to M management category because of 
rehabilitation work resolved identified conflicts. 



0430 



South Poverty 



M An additional 1 ,094 AUMs are permitted as a result of the Sharp 

Top wildfire rehabilitation and Paisley Agreement. Change from 
I to M management category because rehabilitation work re- 
solved identified conflicts. 



0431 



0432 



Narrows 



Coleman Seeding 



M Reduce preference by 40 AUMs as a result of the Paisley 

Agreement. 

M Reduce preference 1,415 AUMs as a result of the Paisley Agree- 

ment. 



0433 



East Jug Mountain 



M Additional ten miles of fence; 9,87 1 acres of seeding are a result 

of the Sharp Top wildfire and rehabilitation. An additional four 
miles of pipeline were installed. An additional 1,086 AUMs of 
preference are allocated because of the wildfire rehabilitation 
and Paisley Agreement. Change from an I to M management 
category because rehabilitation work resolved identified con- 
flicts. 



0502 



0507 



0514 



Fitzgerald 



Laird 



Corn Lake 



C Decrease preference by 1 7 AUMs as part of the Warner Wetlands 

ACEC implementation agreement. 

C Decrease preference by 54 AUMs as part of the Warner Wetlands 

ACEC implementation agreement. 

I 783 AUMs of suspended nonuse was transferred to 0516 Rabbit 

Basin and activated as a result of wildfire and subsequent 
rehabilitation. 



0515 



Juniper Mountain 



M 869 AUMs of suspended nonuse was transferred to 0530 East 

Rabbit Hills and activated as a result of wildfire and subsequent 
rehabilitation. 



0516 



Rabbit Basin 



M As a result of wildfire and rehabilitation, this allotment was 

divided into four allotments, additional forage was allocated to 
activate suspended nonuse from other allotments. About 8,780 
acres were burned and seeded, and an additional 2,000 acres were 
burned but not seeded. The new, smaller 0530 East Rabbit Hills, 
0529 North Rabbit Hills, and 0531 South Rabbit Hills allotments 
were formed from the 05 16 Rabbit Basin. The new allotments are 
about half the size of the old, and produces about 400 percent 
more forage. Suspended nonuse was transferred from 05 14 Corn 
Lake, 05 1 5 Juniper Mountain, 05 17 Coyote-Colvin, 05 18 Clover 
Creek, 0519 Fish Creek, and 0520 Lynch-Flynn allotments, and 
activated as a result of the permanently available additional 
forage. 



28 



Allot. 

No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 

Allotment Categorization 



0517 



Coyote-Colvin 



1,200 AUMs of suspended nonuse were transferred to 0516 
Rabbit Basin and 0529 South Rabbit Hills allotment as a result of 
the rehabilitation work in Rabbit Basin. 



0518 



Clover Creek 



M Some suspended nonuse was transferred to 0516 Rabbit Basin 

and some to 0529 South Rabbit Hills and activated as a result of 
rehabilitation work. 



0519 



Fish Creek 



An additional 1.5 miles of fence was constructed to better 
manage riparian areas. Suspended nonuse was transferred to 
05 16 Rabbit Basin allotment and activated. 



0520 



Lynch-Flynn 



467 AUMs suspended nonuse was transferred to 0530 East 
Rabbit Hills and 0531 North Rabbit Hills and activated. 



0523 



0529 



Warner Lakes 



South Rabbit Hills 



M 



Preference was decreased by 432 AUMs in order to implement 
the Warner Wedands ACEC plan. A portion of the allotment was 
withdrawn from livestock grazing use. 

A new allotment was divided from the old 0516 Rabbit Basin 
allotment as a result of a wildfire and rehabilitation. 



0530 



East Rabbit Hills 



M A new allotment was divided from the old 0516 Rabbit Basin 

allotment as a result of a wildfire and rehabilitation. 



0531 



North Rabbit Hills 



M A new allotment was divided from the old 05 16 Rabbit Basin 

Allotment as a result of a wildfire and rehabilitation. 



0704 



0709 



0711 



Ward Lake 



Dead Indian-Duncan 



South Hayes Butte 



Evaluation of 1993 indicates need to reduce active preference by 
128 AUMs. Adjustment is proposed at this time. 

170 AUMs of suspended nonuse were transferred to 0433 East 
Jug Mountain and activated. 

Recommended to change management category from M to I 
based on significant increase in juniper and resulting watershed 
issues. 



0712 


Bridge Well 


0902 


Cinder Butte 


0907 


Devils Garden 


0909 


Button Springs 


0913 


Individual 



M Activate 138 AUMs allowed on a temporary nonrenewable basis 

as a result of the 1990 allotment evaluation and 1992 AMP. 

M 420 acres were prescribe burned. 

M No grazing preference is allocated, but forage is reserved for 

livestock use on an emergency replacement basis. 

M One well and 1 ,720 acres of prescribed burning were completed 

to meet Land Use Plan objectives. 

N/A All public land in the allotment were sold, and preference was 

cancelled. 



29 



Allot. 
No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 

Allotment Categorization 



0916 

1000 
1001 



1002 
1072 



Wahl 

Little Juniper Spring 
Alkali Winter 



Bar 75 Ranch 
South Butte Valley 



N/A 

I 
M 



C 
C 



All public land in the allotment were sold, and preference was 
cancelled. 

Additional 6,080 acres of brush control resulted from wildfire. 

Additional 13.5 miles offence; 15,880 acres of seeding; and 
6, 100 acres of brush control are a result of the Sharp Top wildfire. 
An additional 1 ,805 AUMs are allocated based on the additional 
forage resulting from the rehabilitation. 

Preference decreased by 86 AUMs. 

New allotment was divided from 1001 Alkali Winter allotment. 
877 AUMs active preference is pending appeal of decision 
transferring from Warner Lakes allotment, implementing Warner 
Wetlands ACEC plan. 



Section II 



Allotments Scheduled to be Evaluated Within the Next Year 



0511 


Northeast Warner (I) 


0705 


Oatman Flat (I) 


0710 


Murdock (I) 


0517 


Coyote/Colvin (I) 


0102 


Crack-in-the-ground (I) 


0914 


West Green Mountain (I) 



AMPs/CRMPs Completed or In Progress 



0212 
0216 
0704 



Rahilly - Gravelly (Revision) 
O'Keefe Individual (Revision) 
Ward Lake 



30 



LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA 


- GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 












Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 
















M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife Wild Horses 




Livestock (AUMs) 




Period 


Grazing 


AMP 


Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1987/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


1983 


1987 


1993 


SNU 1 ' 


of Use v 


System 3/ 


Date 


Evaluation 


0100 


Peter Creek 


I/M 


13,800 


640 


30 





329 


329 


329 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


1990 




0101 


East Green Mtn 


M/M 


17,241 


1,440 


315 





980 


980 


980 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


1993 


- 


0102 


Crack-in-the-Ground 


I/I 


15,419 


400 


143 





298 


298 


298 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


- 


- 


*0103 


ZX-Christmas Lake 


I/I 


524,180 


54,640 


529 


408 


29,169 


29,169 


31,069 


6,588 


Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


- 


1990 


*0104 


Bottomless Lake 


C/C 


565 











50 











Fa,Wi 


D 


- 


- 


*0105 


Bunchgrass Butte 


c/c 


1,680 























Su,Fa 


D 


- 


- 


0200 


Blue Creek 


c/c 


600 





50 





131 


131 








Su,Fa 


S 


- 


- 


*0201 


Vinyard Individual 


MA 


8,600 


160 


112 





510 


510 


510 


100 


Sp.Su 


RR 


1969 


1993 


*0202 


Hickey Individual 


M/M 


10,906 


90 


102 





519 


519 


583 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


1975 


1993 


*0203 


O'Keefe 


C/C 


565 





2 





48 


48 


48 





Sp 


S 


- 


- 


*0204 


Crump Individual 


I/I 


2,930 


395 


50 





92 


92 


92 





Sp.Su 


RR 


- 


1993 


*0205 


Greaser Drift 


I/M 


9,210 





100 





306 


306 


306 





Fa,Wi 


D 


- 


- 


*0206 


Lane Plan n 


I/I 


9,910 


3,330 


146 





450 


450 


450 





Sp.Su 


RR 


1970 


1993 


*0207 


Lane Plan I 


M/M 


24,725 


1,370 


200 





1,942 


1,942 


1,942 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


1971 


1993 


0208 


Sagehen 


M/M 


3,820 


2,050 


60 





266 


266 


266 





Fa 


S 


- 


1992 


0209 


Schadler 


C/C 


790 





20 





57 


57 


57 





Su,Fa 


s 


- 


- 


*0210 


Rim 


M/M 


2,376 


680 


15 





91 


49 


49 





Sp.Su 


S 


- 


- 


*0211 


Round Mountain 


M/M 


16,330 


1,640 


183 





1,102 


1,102 


1,102 





Sp.Su 


RR 


1970 


1990 


*0212 


Rahilly-Gravelly 


I/I 


33,285 


2,031 


111 





1,781 


1,781 


1,781 





Sp.Su.Fa 


RR 


- 


1992 


0213 


Burro Springs 


M/M 


7,500 





60 





279 


279 


279 





Sp,Wi 


D 


- 


1992 


*0214 


Chukar Springs 


M/M 


1,764 





15 







52 


52 





Sp 


S 


- 


- 


*0215 


Hill Camp 


M/M 


30,790 


2,710 


300 





3,932 


3,932 


3,932 





Sp.Su.Fa 


RR 


1975 


- 


*0216 


O'Keefe Individual 


I/I 


50,330 


3,010 


266 





4,808 


4,808 


4,808 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


1989 


- 


*0217 


Cox Individual 


M/M 


4,670 


60 


70 





300 


374 


374 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


D 


1972 


- 


*0218 


Sandy Seeding 


M/M 


4,850 





30 





417 


600 


600 





Sp 


S 


- 


1993 


0219 


Cahill 


C/C 


470 





20 





280 


280 


280 





Fa,Wi 


- 


- 


- 


*0222 


Fisher Lake 


M/M 


4,230 


656 


50 





529 


529 


781 





Sp,Wi 


DR 


1975 


1992 


*0223 


Hickey 


C/C 


412 





61 





64 


64 








Sp 


- 


- 


1992 



' J LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA 


- GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 














Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 














M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife Wild Horses Livestock (AUMs) 




Period 


Grazing AMP Allotment 




No. 


Name 


1987/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 1983 1987 1993 


SNU" 


of Use 2 ' 


System 3/ Date Evaluation 




*0400 


Paisley Common 



















. 


. 






Original 


I/C 


101,531 


1,048 


65 


123 





- 


- 






Coglan HUls 


CM 


12,774 





15 


149 117 





Sp 


S 






Diablo Peak 


c/c 


74,098 








123 





- 


- 






Abert Rim 


c/c 


14,659 





65 








- 


- 




0401 


Fenced Federal 


c/c 


160 


520 





16 16 16 





Sp 


S 




0403 


Pine Creek 


c/c 


400 


1,160 


2 


18 18 18 





Sp 


s 




*0404 


Willow Creek 


J/M 


11,805 


8,848 


10 


346 346 472 





Sp,Su 


RR 




0406 


West Clover Flat 


C/C 


748 


2,776 


2 


15 15 15 





Sp.Fa 


DR 




0407 


Clover Flat 


M/M 


2,521 


4,851 


20 


200 200 200 





Sp 


RR 




0408 


Schoolhouse 


C/M 


55 


1,980 





2 2 2 





Sp 


S 




*0409 


Tucker Hill 


M/M 


3,534 


323 


20 


136 136 





- 


. 




0410 


Tim Long Creek 


C/C 


285 


1,155 





13 13 13 





Sp.Su 


S 




0411 


Jones Canyon 


c/c 


636 








13 13 13 





Sp 


s 




*0412 


Fir Timber Butte 


M/M 


3,462 


3,172 


22 


199 199 58 





Sp,Su 


S - 1992 




0415 


Briggs Garden 


C/C 


785 


899 


7 


42 42 42 





Sp 


S 




0416 


White Rock 


c/c 


565 


438 


1 


10 10 10 





Sp,Su,Fa 


S 




0418 


Squaw Lake 


M/M 


43,269 


520 


96 


52 834 834 834 





Sp 


RR 




*0419 


St. Patrick's 


M/M 


23,460 


1,240 


53 


29 1,680 750 





Sp 


RR 




0420 


Egli Rim 


M/M 


21,052 





31 


11 567 925 925 





Sp,Su 


RR 




0421 


Rosebud 


M/M 


10,640 


2,040 


6 


158 158 158 





Wi 


S 




*0422 


Paisley Flat 


M/M 


4,549 





20 


837 467 585 





Sp.Wi 


RR - 1992 




0423 


Hill Field 


M/M 


4,198 


1,140 





239 239 239 





Sp,Su,Fa 


S 




*0425 


Pike Ranch 


C/M 


4,560 


1,600 





95 95 95 





Fa 


S 




*0426 


Five Mile Butte 


I/I 


41,815 


1,216 


15 


45 525 674 1,021 





Sp,Wi 


RR - 1992 




*0427 


XL 


I/I 


64,295 


190 


175 


6,250 6,250 6,940 





Sp,Su,Wi 


RR - 1992 




*0428 


Sheeprock 


I/I 


144,025 


4,460 


117 


367 4,000 4,000 4,000 





Sp 


RR 




*0429 


Twin Lakes 


I/M 


17,050 





30 


2,225 2,271 





Sp.Su 


DR - 1992 



LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA - GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 














] 


Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 














M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife 


Wild Horses 




livestock (AUMs) 




Period 


Grazing 


AMP Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1987/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


1983 


1987 


1993 


SNU" 


of Use 2 ' 


System 3 ' 


Date Evaluation 


*0430 


South Poverty 


I/M 


26,268 














387 


1,481 





Sp,Su,Wi 


RR 


1992 


*0431 


Narrows 


M/M 


8,486 


180 


40 





315 


315 


275 





Wi 


RR 


- 


*0432 


Coleman Seeding 


M/M 


6,000 





35 





2,887 


2,335 


920 





Sp.Su 


DR 


1992 


*0433 


East Jug 


I/M 


10,634 





30 








1,150 


2,236 





Sp.Su 


RR 


1992 


*0434 


West Jug 


I/M 


12,710 























Wi,Sp 


R 


1992 


0501 


Flynn 


C/C 


2,780 





55 





120 


120 


120 


134 


Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


S 


- 


*0502 


Fitzgerald 


C/C 


5,150 





60 





346 


346 


329 





Sp 


S 


- 


0503 


Taylor 


C/C 


6,110 





60 





295 


295 


295 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


*0504 


Kiely 


C/C 


390 











23 


23 


23 





- 


- 


- 


0505 


Lynch 


C/C 


180 











20 


20 


20 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


0506 


McKee 


C/C 


100 











10 


10 


10 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


*0507 


Laird 


C/C 


2,030 











164 


164 


110 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


0508 


Rock Creek Ranch 


C/C 


280 











9 


9 








Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


0509 


Cox Butte 


I/T 


38,340 





63 





1,196 


1,196 


1,196 


124 


Sp,Su,Fa 


S 


1993 


0510 


Orijana Rim 


I/I 


57,280 





100 





1,423 


1,423 


1,423 


352 


Sp,Su,Fa 


s 


- 


0511 


Northeast Warner 


I/I 


139,019 


1,680 


12 





5,956 


5,956 


5,956 


702 


Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


s 


- 


0512 


North Bluejoint 


m 


22,440 


3,640 


100 





289 


289 


289 


79 


Sp.Su 


s 


- 


*0514 


Corn Lake 


m 


78,476 


1,710 


46 





2,663 


2,663 


2,663 


639 


Sp,Su 


RR 


1993 


*0515 


Juniper Mountain 


M/M 


91,720 


440 


116 





3,621 


3,621 


3,621 


796 


Sp.Su.Fa 


RR 


- 


*0517 


Coyote-Colvin 


I/I 


123,038 


15,002 


87 





5,091 


5,091 


5,091 


919 


Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


RR 


- 


*0518 


Clover Creek 


M/M 


10,050 


1,354 


8 





435 


435 


435 





Su,Fa 


RR 


- 


*0519 


Fish Creek 


I/I 


11,805 


10,446 


44 





575 


575 


575 





Sp.Su 


RR 


- 


*0520 


Lynch-Flynn 


I/I 


18,800 


4,260 


55 





882 


882 


882 





Sp,Su 


RR 


- 


0521 


Priday Reservoir 


M/M 


780 


720 


139 





65 


65 


65 


35 


Sp 


D 


- 


0522 


Abert Seeding 


M/M 


9,200 


320 


60 





2,619 


2,619 


2,619 





Sp,Su 


RR 


1992 


*0523 


Warner Lakes 


I/I 


38,788 


5,650 


50 





1,656 


1,656 


995 


89 


Sp,Su,Fa 


S 


- 


0524 


Lane Individual 


C/C 


2,700 





50 





65 


65 


65 





Sp,Su,Fa 


s 


- 


*0529 


South Rabbit Hills 


I/M 


9,028 

















1,266 





Sp.Wi 


s 


1993 


*0530 


East Rabbit HiDs 


I/M 


8,404 

















1,200 





Sp.Wi 


s 


1993 



* LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA 


- GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 












Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 












M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife Wild Horses Livestock (AUMs) 




Period 


Grazing AMP Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1987/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 1983 1987 1993 


SNU" 


of Use * 


System 3/ Date Evaluation 


*0531 


North Rabbit Hills 


I/M 


11,712 


640 





1,316 





Sp.Wi 


S - 1993 


0600 


Beaty Butte 


I/I 


506,985 


46,455 


444 


2,400 26,121 26,121 26,121 


14,466 


Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


RR 


0700 


Silver-Bridge Ck. 


I/I 


6,645 


265 


69 


262 262 262 


131 


Sp,Su 


RR - 1992 


0701 


Upper Bridge Ck. 


M/M 


1,460 


3,270 


29 


108 108 108 


52 


Sp,Fa 


RR 


0702 


Buck-Bridge Ck. 


M/M 


6,280 


375 


142 


309 309 309 


30 


Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


0703 


Bear Creek 


M/M 


1,155 


990 


36 


107 107 107 


11 


Wi 


S 


*0704 


Ward Lake 


M/I 


12,424 


1,819 


187 


650 650 522 


297 


Sp 


RR - 1993 


0705 


Oatman Flat 


M/I 


28,503 


6,075 


758 


2,082 2,082 2,082 


623 


Sp.Su 


RR 


0706 


Rye Ranch 


M/M 


4,240 





130 


539 539 539 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


0707 


Tuff Butte 


M/M 


9,330 


2,310 


340 


536 536 536 





Sp.Su 


RR 


0708 


Arrow Gap 


C/C 


2,720 


160 





135 135 135 


25 


Sp.Su 


S 


*0709 


Dead Indian-Duncan 


M/I 


18,790 


2,420 


647 


586 586 586 


117 


Sp.Su 


RR 


0710 


Murdock 


I/I 


4,468 


1,668 


72 


545 545 545 


160 


Sp,Su 


RR 


*0711 


South Haynes Butte 


M/I 


1,490 


710 


17 


88 88 88 


50 


Sp,Su,Fa 


S 


*0712 


Bridge Well 


C/M 


1,400 


1,050 


99 


50 50 188 





Sp 


RR 1992 1990 


0713 


Silver Creek 


M/M 


2,785 


640 


62 


200 200 200 





Sp 


RR 1992 1990 


0714 


Table Rock 


C/C 


4,110 


120 


173 





250 


- 


. 


0716 


Silver Lake-Lakebed 


C/C 


680 








250 250 250 





Wi 


S 


0900 


Fremont 


M/M 


26,362 


511 


1,229 


1,970 1,970 1,970 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


0901 


Wastina 


M/M 


6,366 





311 


419 419 419 





Sp,Fa 


DRR 


*0902 


Cinder Butte 


M/M 


11,216 


320 


634 


923 923 923 





Su,Fa,Wi 


DRR 


0903 


Beasley Lake 


M/M 


2,640 


534 


66 


6 232 232 232 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


0904 


Highway 


M/M 


3,675 


989 


91 


244 244 244 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


DRR 


0905 


Homestead 


M/M 


13,837 


9,728 


508 


805 805 805 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


DRR 


0906 


North Webster 


M/M 


1,071 


3,416 


51 


112 112 112 





Su.Fa 


S 


*0907 


Devil's Garden 


M/M 


4,406 





116 


287 287 





Sp,Su,Fa 


RR 


0908 


Cougar Mountain 


M/M 


8,282 


3,405 


534 


616 616 616 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


DRR 


*0909 


Button Springs 


M/M 


8,779 


1,240 


252 


1,068 1,068 1,068 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


0910 


Hogback Butte 


M/M 


4,384 


4,284 


182 


680 680 680 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR - 1992 



LAKEVIEW RESOURCE AREA - GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 







M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife 


Wild Horses 




Livestock (AUMs) 




Period 


Grazing 


AMP 


Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1987/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


1983 


1987 


1993 


SNU 1 ' 


of Use v 


System 3/ 


Date 


Evaluation 


0911 


Valley 


M/M 


6,600 


769 


137 





669 


669 


669 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


- 


- 


*0913 


Individual 


C/C 


240 











24 


24 








- 


- 


- 


- 


0914 


West Green Mtn 


M/M 


21,656 


4,406 


213 





1,233 


1,233 


1,233 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


DRR 


1984 


- 


0915 


Squaw Butte 


M/M 


8,230 


460 


535 





1,000 


1,000 


1,000 





Sp,Su,Fa 


DRR 


1985 


- 


*0916 


Wahl 


C/C 














10 


10 








- 


- 


- 


- 


*1000 


Little Juniper Spring 


I/I 


116,836 


780 


480 





5,418 


5,418 


5,418 





Sp,Su,Fa 


- 


- 


- 


*1001 


Alkali Winter 


M/M 


87,570 


6,817 








4,418 


4,918 


6,223 





Wi 


- 


- 


- 


*1002 


Bar 75 Ranch 


C/C 


2,588 











159 


159 


73 





Sp,Su,Fa,Wi 


S 


- 


- 


*1072 


South Butte Valley 


N/A/M 


3,710 

















877 





Wi 


S 


- 


- 


1300 


Becraft 


C/C 


120 





5 





10 


10 


10 





Fa 


S 


- 


- 


1301 


Crooked Creek 


C/C 


240 





5 





10 


10 


10 





Sp,Su 


s 


- 


- 


1302 


Thomas Creek 


C/C 


40 





14 





30 


30 


30 





Su,Fa 


s 


- 


- 


1303 


O'Keefe 


C/C 


280 





10 





20 


20 


20 





Sp,Su 


S 


- 


- 


1305 


Schultz 


C/C 


200 





14 





29 


29 


29 





Sp.Su.Fa 


s 


- 


- 


1306 


Simms 


M/M 


363 





27 





55 


55 


55 





Sp 


S 


- 


- 


1308 


Barry 


C/C 


120 











4 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



* Explanation of changes in allotment narrative. 
'/ SNU = Suspended Nonuse 

V Sp = Spring; Su = Summer; Fa - Fall; Wi - Winter (use periods) 

V DRR - Deferred Rest Rotation; RR = Rest Rotation; D = Deferred Rotation 











Upper Klamath River (photo by Ron Hicks) 



37 




California 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OP THE INTERIOR 
Bure&u of Land Management 

Klamath Falls Resource Area 
Lakeview District 



is. 



LAND STATUS 




LEGEND 


■ 


Resource Area Office 






Planning Area Boundary 




<5 


Interstate Highway 






Highway 






® 


U.S. Highway 






Stream 








State Highway 
Urban Area 
City 




H 
H 


Oregon and California 

(O&C) Lands 

Public Domain Lands 




• 



39 



Klamath Falls Resource Area 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area planning area consists 
of 213,000 acres of BLM-administered surface and 
subsurface estate (see map 2), and 21,000 acres of BLM 
subsurface estate only (private or state owned surface.) 
This section includes some of the projects in the Klamath 
Falls Resource Area. This section contains updates on the 
Wood River Ranch, ecosystem management, resource 
management plan, RAP camp, and the Lorella pumped 
storage project, as well as program summaries, accom- 
plishments for FY93, work planned for FY94, a 1993 EA 
register, and RPS update. A mailing list update is 
included on page 65. 



Wood River Ranch 
Acquisition Update 

The Klamath Falls Resource Area (KFRA) purchased 
1,540 acres (the south half) of the Wood River Ranch, 
which is located almost 25 miles north of Klamath Falls, 
Oregon, on July 16, 1993 with money appropriated by the 
Congress. The entire parcel is 3,220 acres, bounded on 
the south by Agency Lake, on the east by the Wood River 
and Wood River Marsh, on the north-northwest by a dike, 
and on the west-southwest by Sevenmile Canal (see map 
on opposite page). The KFRA is planning to purchase the 
north half (1,680 acres) in fiscal year 1994 through 
additional Congressional appropriation or land exchange. 
Historically wetland habitat, the property was diked and 
drained to serve as irrigated pastureland for over 50 years. 
While no management direction was specified by the 
Congress with the appropriated funds, based on discus- 
sions with the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish & 
Wildlife Service, American Land Conservancy, the 
Klamath Basin Water Users Advisory Council, and 
others, the management of the Wood River Ranch is 
intended for wetland restoration, which includes research 
of the cause and effects of wetland restoration, as well as 
to demonstrate the associated benefits. 

In anticipation of this land acquisition, an interdiscipli- 
nary interagency group, called the Wood River Wetland 
Team (WRWT), was formed by the BLM to guide future 
management of the Wood River Ranch. President Clinton 
has made it clear that agencies will be working together to 
manage ecosystems; this is a working example of his 
direction. Federal, state, and local agencies are members 
of the team, as well as several interest groups and the 
Klamath Tribe. The purpose/charter of the team is to 

40 = 



develop management goals and objectives by consensus, 
ensure proposed actions and projects are consistent with 
those goals and objectives, use a team approach to define 
problems and develop solutions, serve as a role model for 
a cooperative management process, develop a manage- 
ment plan for the property, and coordinate and exchange 
information with other agencies and groups in the 
Klamath Basin. 

The team, which has been meeting monthly, identified 
three primary and several secondary management goals 
for the property. The primary goals are to restore the 
majority of the Wood River property to a functioning 
wetland community; to improve water quality entering 
Agency and Upper Klamath lakes; and to restore and 
enhance wetland habitat, primarily for Lost River and 
shortnose suckers, waterfowl, and secondarily for other 
species. Secondary goals include providing for public 
recreation and environmental education; coordinating 
multi-agency research and adaptive management on the 
Wood River property; and addressing ecosystem goals 
with other agencies, landowners, and organizations while 
planning for and restoring the wetland habitat. Presently, 
the WRWT is assisting the BLM in development of an 
environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Wood River 
property. The anticipated completion date of the EIS/ 
management plan is late spring 1994, preceeded by a draft 
EIS and comment period. If you would like to get 
involved early in this process, would like to be added to 
the mailing list, or have comments or questions, please 
call Cathy Humphrey at the Klamath Falls Resource Area 
(503) 885-4242. 




Agency Lake, taken from southern boundary of Wood 
River Ranch 



Wood River Ranch 



LEGEND 



PRIVATE PROPERTY 



BLM-AD1BNISTERED LANDS 




Ecosystem Based 
Management 



Recently the Lakeview District BLM started discussions 
with the Fremont and Winema National Forests, the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, 
and others regarding cooperative management ideas. 



Ecosystem based management is a process that considers 
the total environment, rather than parts of it. The objec- 
tive of such management is to sustain whole ecosystems 
rather than any single part in isolation. It blends the long- 
term needs of people and environmental values in such a 
way that the lands will support diverse, healthy, produc- 
tive and sustainable ecosystems. 

The major difference between current management and 
ecosystem management in the BLM is the change in 
focus. In an ecosystem management approach, sustaining 
a healthy, functioning ecosystem is the primary focus, 
around which other activities would revolve. Current and 
traditional activities, such as grazing allotments, mineral 
leasing, timber harvest, or recreational opportunities, will 
be managed to support the primary focus of sustaining the 
ecosystem. This new focus for the BLM would result in 
many other differences, including managing on a broader, 
landscape scale giving more consideration to the role of 
non-BLM managed lands; working more with adjacent 
landowners or land managers; forming more partnerships 
and interdisciplinary teams (such as the Wood River 
Wetland Team); applying more broadly relevant data to 
on-the-ground management; being more accountable and 
measuring progress differently; and having a higher level 
of public involvement in decision making (such as this 
publication which encourages early public input.) 

A landscape would be defined on natural features of the 
land, such as watershed boundaries or geologic forma- 
tions, and includes both public and private lands. That 
landscape would be analyzed to define current conditions 
on both the public and private lands. Once the land- 
scape's current conditions are described, the BLM would 
be able to determine the kind of management needed to 
bring BLM-administered lands into more favorable 
conditions. 

Cooperative management with other landowners in a 
landscape could help avoid some of the problems that 
have occurred in the past. For example, the BLM might 
want to avoid harvesting timber in a watershed if it 
appeared that much of the watershed had heavy timber 
harvests in the past and water quality had suffered as a 
result. On the other hand, if the watershed had a good mix 
of forest types and fair or better water quality, but forest 
health in part of the watershed was suffering, then 
selective timber harvests might improve the forest health 
without affecting water quality. 

Such cooperative management is already starting to occur. 



Resource Management 
Plan Update 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area office, in conjunction 
with five other BLM offices in western Oregon, released a 
draft Resource Management Plan/Environmental Impact 
Statement (RMP/EIS) in August 1992, which was 
followed by a 120-day comment period. The final RMP/ 
EIS has been postponed from its planned summer 1993 
release. On April 2, 1993 President Clinton held a Forest 
Conference in Portland, Oregon, the result of which was a 
directive to the BLM, the Forest Service, the Fish and 
Wildlife Service, and several other agencies to come up 
with a joint recommendation for how to solve the "timber 
crisis." This group, the post forest conference team, 
developed a Supplemental Environmental Impact State- 
ment (SEIS), published July 1993. The final SEIS is due 
out in November 1993. The six western Oregon BLM 
offices will finalize their RMP/EISs in mid-1994, 
incorporating the President's SEIS. 

For more information or a copy of the draft RMP/EIS, 
contact Cathy Humphrey at (503) 885-4242. 



RAP Camp 



Resources and People (RAP) Camp is a joint effort by the 
Forest Service and the BLM to educate high school 
students about natural resource management. The camp 
was held for the second time at Camp Cottonwood and 
the Oregon Institute of Technology and ran from July 1 1 
to July 18, 1993. The camp is designed for high school 
students aged 15 to 17. Its goal is to educate students 
about natural resource management, provide college and 
career counseling, and promote cultural diversity aware- 
ness. This year there were a number of field trips and 
classroom presentations and then the students developed a 
land management plan based on those sessions. Some- 
thing new for this year was the expanded opportunity for 
teachers to learn more about natural resource manage- 
ment. Students from all over Oregon and northern 
California attended. Keep an eye out for information 
about next year's camp. 



42 



Lorella Pumped Storage 
Project 

Energy Storage Partners, Inc. has received a preliminary 
permit from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 
(FERC) to evaluate the proposed Lorella Hydroelectric 
Pumped Storage Project. Energy Storage Partners has 
also filed a right-of-way application with the BLM to use 
public lands that would be occupied if the project is 
constructed. The project, located approximately three 
miles southeast of Bonanza, Oregon, would occupy 
approximately 400 acres of BLM-administered lands, 
900 acres total. The project would consist of an upper 
and lower reservoir connected by a 24-foot diameter 
concrete lined power tunnel, with an underground 
powerhouse containing four turbines, providing 1,000 
megawatts of power. The project would pump water from 



the lower reservoir to the upper reservoir during the 
evening and weekend off-peak hours when power is less 
expensive. During peak demand periods the project 
would release water from the upper reservoir to the lower 
reservoir generating higher cost power for 10 hours per 
day, five days per week. Coal or other fossil fueled 
power plants used to meet peak demand in the western 
United States could be reduced or replaced by the project. 
The estimated construction cost of the project is SI. 19 
billion (in 2001 dollars), and would employ 50 to 500 
people. 

The BLM is a cooperating agency with FERC in preparation 
of the EIS that is being prepared for the project. The Draft 
EIS is anticipated to be completed in late 1994. The BLM is 
identifying areas and resources to be avoided during con- 
struction. For more information contact Tom Cottingham at 
(503)885-4211. 




l_ 







John C. Boyle powerhouse, part of an existing hydroelectric project in the Klamath Falls Resource Area (photo by Ron Hicks) 

::: = r 43 



Program Summaries and Accomplishments for 
FY93; Work Planned for FY94 



Botany 



The botany program ensures that special plant habitats are 
protected in the operation of the BLM's multiple use pro- 
grams. This is achieved by conducting plant surveys on 
public lands and monitoring population trends of sensitive 

species. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 

Botanical clearance surveys were conducted for two 
proposed chip thin timber sales, three proposed salvage 
sales, two right-of-ways, two proposed land sales, two 
recreational site improvement projects, four range 
improvements (three fences, one reservoir), and one 
mining claim. Approximately 4,560 acres were surveyed 
for special status plants. 

* Monitoring oiRorippa columbiae, Federal candidate 2 

species (FC2): Public and private lands on Stukel 
Mountain were surveyed with a total of 54 plants 
found this year - up from 26 plants found in 1992. 
However, many plants were still seedlings and only 
ten plants were found on public land, up from only 
six plants in 1992. 

* Twelve Forest Service botanists representing three 

national forests participated in the monitoring of 
Rorippa columbiae (FC2) in order to observe this 
species in the field, and thereby be better prepared to 
conduct inventories on FS lands. 

* Nine new populations of special status (all Bureau 

assessment species) plants were found in 1993. This 
included three populations of Calochortus 
longebarbatus var. longebarbatus, four populations 
of Silene nuda ssp. insectivora, and two populations 
of Allium campanulatum. 

* Approximately 350 acres of "wet meadow habitat" has 

been inventoried for Astragulus applegatel, federally 
listed as endangered. Approximately 80 acres that 
were planned for inventory were not surveyed 
because access was denied. 



* Klamath River Canyon exclosures vegetation data. 

Initial vegetation data were collected from 24 
vegetation sample plots: four plots inside, and four 
plots outside each of three exclosures in the Klamath 
River Canyon. This data will be used to monitor 
plant community changes and changes in similarity 
between plants communities inside and outside of the 
exclosures. 

* Facilitation of the Spencer Creek Coordinated Resource 

Management Plan (CRMP). Three meetings of 
CRMP participants were held during 1993. Discus- 
sions centered on funding for proposed fencing 
projects on Buck Lake (private land) intended to 
mitigate sedimentation problems in Spencer Creek 
and the results of a watershed analysis conducted by 
Weyerhaueser scientists. Macroinvertebrate samples 
were also collected. 

* Approximately 75 additional plant species were 

collected, processed, identified, and added to the 
resource area herbarium. The herbarium now 
contains a total of approximately 560 species. 

* Traversed the boundary of the Old Baldy Potential 

Research Natural Area (RNA) to establish a more 
precise record of the boundary. This area is recom- 
mended for RNA designation in the draft RMP since 
the plant communities it contains are not represented 
elsewhere in the RNA system. 

* Collected seed of four native grass species from two sites 

(two species at each site.) Collections are in support of 
the development of a contract to determine scarification 
requirements and viability of native grass species from 
BLM lands in Oregon and Washington. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Inventory for populations of special status plant species 
emphasizing potential habitat for Limnanthes 
floccosa ssp. bellingeriana (FC2), and Mimulus 
pygmaeus (FC2) would continue the inventory on 
BLM-administered lands in the resource area as 
indicated in the budget directives and Fish and 
Wildlife 2000 priorities. 



44 



* Re-monitor the known population oiRorippa columbiae 

(FC2) in the resource area. Monitoring in FY92 
found only 25-30 plants on both BLM and private 
lands, down from an estimated 100-125 plants in 
1983. Only six plants were on BLM-administered 
land. A total of 54 plants were found in FY93, but 
only ten were on BLM-administered lands and were 
seedlings. The monitoring of special status plant 
species is a high priority in the budget directives and 
the Fish and Wildlife 2000 initiative. 

* Penstemon glaucinus (FC2), has been known to occur 

on Yainax Butte for a number of years and has been 
qualitatively monitored each year. A plan would be 
written to quantitatively monitor this population and 
its response to environmental factors such as fire. 

* A plan would be written to quantitatively monitor 

known populations of Limnanthes floccosa ssp. 
bellingeriana (FC2) on O&C lands to determine the 
effectiveness of conservation recommendations 
relative to management actions, such as timber sales, 
and response to environmental factors, such as fire. 

*Establish monitoring plots and collect initial data on 
known populations of Limnanthes floccosa ssp. 
bellingeriana (FC2.) This effort would initiate 
monitoring of special status plant species on O&C 
lands as indicated in the AWP directives and Fish and 
Wildlife 2000 priorities. 



Cultural/Paleontological 
Resources 



All cultural programs for the Klamath Falls Resource 
Area are being handled from the Lakeview Resource 
Area. See the Cultural/Paleontological Resources section 
on page 10 for Klamath Falls information. 



Fire/Aviation 



The BLM's fire and aviation programs are important 
support programs. Fire management has two major focus 
programs, suppressing wild fires and conducting pre- 
scribed burns to benefit wildlife and range management, 
among other programs. The aviation program supports 
various activities including firefighting, insect damage, 
and wild horse and wildlife census surveys. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 

* Completed 896 acres of underburning in the Gerber and 
Stukel Mountain areas. 

'94 Program Plans 



* Weather permitting, between 1,000 and 2,000 acres are 

planned for underburning in the following areas: 
Devaul, Holbrook, Big Alkali, Yainax Butte, Key- 
hole, Paddock, Bly, Bryant, Topsy 1 and 2, River 
Edge, 41 Ranch, Wilkerson Horse Camp, Wild Horse 
Rim, and Webber Eagle Habitat Area. 

* Broadcast burning is being planned in the Griffin Site 

Preparations area (45 acres), and the Willow Valley 
area (1,000 acres). 



Forestry 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area contains 58,300 acres 
of commercial forest land. Over 70 percent of these lands 
are revested Oregon and California (O&C) grant lands 
located west of Klamath Falls. They support a mixed 
conifer forest with ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, white fir, 
and Shasta red fir as the major species. The resource 
area's O&C lands are subject to a court injunction 
prohibiting timber sales and other activities which could 
adversely affect northern spotted owl habitat. In effect, 
this has prevented the resource area from offering most 
scheduled west side sales. Also, several years of drought 
have triggered extensive mortality of white fir, which is 
expected to continue. 

East of Klamath Falls, the BLM-administered lands 
contain 16,200 acres of commercial forest land, about 30 
percent of the resource area's total. These lands are nearly 
all ponderosa pine, or pine mixed with western juniper. 
The recent listing of the Lost River and short-nosed 
suckers as threatened and endangered requires that east 
side timber sales be evaluated for their effects on these 
species. Stands containing a white fir component (less 
than ten percent of the east side's commercial forest) are 
undergoing extensive mortality in the white fir. The 
drought has also resulted in locally heavy mortality of 
ponderosa pine. 

The east side also contains 55,000 acres of juniper wood- 
lands. Recent studies of the feasibility of juniper harvest for 
lumber have been promising, and increased harvest of the 

= 45 



juniper woodlands can be expected in future years. Juniper 
harvest can be designed to maximize favorable impacts on 
wildlife habitat, visual resources, and watershed values. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 

* East side salvage sales offered: Swan Lake Fire 

Salvage (195,000 board feet), Johnny Out Fire 
Salvage (1,500,000 board feet), and East Side 
Salvage (105,000 board feet - no bid received). 

* Four timber trespasses investigated. 

* Responded to two timber sale protests. 

* Cruised timber on one land sale in Plum Valley. 

* Harvested approximately 300 to 400 acres on an active 

timber sale - Kent Circle. 

* Mechanical site preparation: 105 acres. 

* Underburned 896 acres to reduce fuel loads and 

reintroduce periodic fire as an ecosystem component. 

* Reforestation: 856 acres planted with 300,000 seed- 

lings. 

* Tubing: 86 acres of seedlings protected against 

browsing by deer and rabbits. 

* Paper mulched 78 acres to suppress grass and forb 

competition to planted seedlings. 

* Shaded the Bear Fox plantation (43 acres) to reduce soil 

moisture loss on a hot, dry slope. 

* Direct control of competing vegetation: 410 acres were 

brushed, and 397 acres were grubbed. 

* Gopher control baiting was completed on 674 acres to 

prevent loss of planted seedlings to pocket gophers. 

* Surveys: 3,000 acres completed, to evaluate stocking 

and condition of new units and existing plantations. 



'94 Program Plans 



* West side umber sales: Section 3 Chip Thin and West 
Side Salvage (exemption from court injunction would 
be needed for this salvage sale.) 



* East side timber sales: Eastside Salvage (to be negoti- 

ated since no oral or sealed bids were received), 
Bryant Mountain and Stukel Mountain Salvages, 
Gerber Bald Eagle Management Area Sale (to reduce 
overstocking of stands to favor development and 
growth of trees suitable for bald eagle nest and perch 
trees.) 

* Complete cruise and timber appraisal for Bly Mountain 

land exchange. 

* Complete processing of three timber trespasses. 

* Mechanical site preparation: 150 acres. 

* Underbuming: Minimum of 1,150 acres. 

* Reforestation: 872 acres. 

* Tubing: 123 acres. 

* Paper mulching: 74 acres. 

* Vegetation control (brushing and grubbing): 1,128 

acres. 

* Precommercial thinning and release thinning: 1,200 

acres. 

* Surveys: 2,100 acres. 

* Cone collection: 250 bushels or more. 



Hazardous Materials 
Management 



Protecting public health and safety and the environment is 
the priority of the hazardous materials management 
program. A major part of the program is the investigation 
and cleanup of public land sites contaminated with 
hazardous materials in conformance with federal and state 
laws. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Responded to reported dumping of hazardous materials 
on public land. Substances were identified as non- 
hazardous and removed for proper disposal. 



46 



'94 Program Plans 



*No units are anticipated. Response to any reports of 
unknown material found on the public lands will 
occur. 



Lands and Realty 



The lands and realty programs complete lands actions in 
support of BLM resource management programs and 
authorizes public land uses by the public sector. These 
actions could include specific land use authorizations, 
direct land sales, land acquisitions, and control of 
unauthorized use and occupancy. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Rights-of-Way: Eight units were completed; utility 

companies were granted four, private citizens were 
granted three, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
received one. 

* Acquisitions: Purchase of the south half of the Wood 

River Ranch (1,540 acres.) 

* Permits/Leases: One unit completed; Universal Studios, 

for the filming of "The River Wild." 

* Compliance: 12 units were completed; eight road or 

utility rights-of-way; two, 20 inch and 6" high, 
pressure natural gas pipelines under the Mineral 
Leasing Act, and one for Universal Studios. 

* Exchanges: No exchanges were processed to comple- 

tion. 

* Minerals permits: One unit was completed for a private 

citizen. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Acquisition/Exchanges: Purchase of the north half of 

the Wood River Ranch (1,680 acres.) 

* Rights-of-way: Eight units are anticipated for comple- 

tion. 

* Permits/leases: None are anticipated. 



* Sales: The resource area has an obligation to dispose of 

approximately the same number of public land acres 
as was acquired with the acquisition of the Wood 
River Ranch. Preliminary work will begin on the 
disposal. 

* Easement Acquisitions: Acquisition of one fence line 

easement and road easement are anticipated. 



Law Enforcement 



Law enforcement for the Klamath Falls Resource Area is 
administered by Lakeview District Ranger, whose 
headquarters is in the Lakeview Resource Area. Please 
refer to the Law Enforcement section on page 14 of this 
update. 



Minerals 



The minerals program for the Klamath Falls Resource 
Area is administered by the Lakeview Resource Area 
Geologist, whose headquarters is located in the Lakeview 
Resource Area. Please refer to the Minerals section on 
page 15 of this update. 



Noxious Weed 
Management 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area has a cooperative 
agreement with Klamath County's Department of Public 
Works to control or eradicate noxious weeds on BLM- 
administered lands in the resource area. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* An environmental assessment (EA) was written for an 
integrated weed control plan for the resource area. 
The finding of no significant impact was signed on 
June 8, 1993. A public comment period ran from 
June 11, 1993 through July 15, 1993. No public 
comments were received. The record of decision to 
implement the plan was signed on July 21, 1993. 



47 



* Served as a member of the noxious weed management 

task group that wrote a strategy plan to implement a 
comprehensive, integrated weed management 
program on BLM-administered lands in Oregon and 
Washington. Members of the group included 
representatives of various BLM districts and resource 
areas and representatives from the Oregon and 
Washington state noxious weed management 
programs. The plan was presented to the state 
management team at their meeting in June. 

* Thirty-six noxious weed infested sites covering approxi- 

mately 200 acres of BLM-administered lands were 
chemically treated by the Klamath County noxious 
weed treatment crew. Sites were monitored by BLM 
personnel for treatment effectiveness and non-target 
effects. 

* Biological control organisms were released at several 

sites. A seed head fly and a weevil for yellow 
starthistle were released at Wild Gal Spring, a seed 
head fly for yellow starthistle was released in the 
Klamath Canyon, and a seed head fly for bull thistle 
was released at Round Valley Reservoir. Organisms 
were supplied by the Oregon Department of Agricul- 
ture (ODA) under the memorandum of agreement 
(MOA) between ODA and BLM. 

* Several new noxious weed infested sites were reported 

by various field personnel. These sites included the 
first known siting of diffuse knapweed on the 
resource area. These sites will be added to the 
operations plan for FY94 under the new EA. 

* Presented an invited paper at the California Exotic Pest 

Plant Symposium in Mooro Bay, California. The 
symposium was the organizational meeting to form a 
California chapter of the Exotic Pest Plant Council 
(EPPC.) 



'94 Program Plans 



* Approximately 50 noxious weed infested sites covering 

approximately 300 acres of BLM -administered lands 
will be chemically treated by the Klamath County 
noxious weed treatment crew. 

* Additional biological control organisms, supplied by 

ODA, will be released in the resource area with 
additional effort aimed at coordinating the release. 

* A noxious weed identification workshop will be held in 

the resource area for field personnel to facilitate and 
encourage reporting of additional noxious weed 
infestation sites. 



Range Management 



The BLMs range management program administers 
livestock grazing activities on about 212,000 acres of land 
in Klamath County. Each year the Klamath Falls Re- 
source Area issues grazing licenses authorizing animal 
unit months (AUMs) on 95 public land allotments. While 
a percentage of the grazing fees collected goes into the 
U.S. Treasury, most is returned to the county or district to 
be used for range improvement projects designed to 
benefit wildlife and watershed resources while improving 
conditions for livestock grazing. 

The range program also collects inventory data and 
monitors range conditions on public lands. Information 
on vegetation utilization levels and trend are collected and 
evaluated to determine whether allotment goals and 
objectives are being met. 

'93 Program Accomplishments 

* Issued approximately 95 grazing use licenses. 

* Completed 1-3/4 miles of pasture division fencing in the 

Bear Valley allotment. 

* Performed rangeland monitoring studies on all utilized I 

and M category allotments. 

* Completed the re-photographing of all existing long- 

term photo trend studies in the Gerber Riparian 
Demonstration Area. Also established two new 
frequency trend studies. 

* Held field meetings with all interested grazing permit- 

tees to explain the rangeland monitoring and evalua- 
tion processes. 

* Settled fully on one willful trespass which was pending 

on appeal, after a hearing before an administrative 
law judge. 

* Completed three grazing exclosures in the Klamath 

River Canyon, in coordination with Pacific Power 
and Light Company, to study the changes possible in 
vegetative communities with protection from 
livestock grazing. 

* Worked extensively with private land holders in the 

Klamath River Canyon to resolve long-term grazing 
conflicts. 

* Performed required maintenance on all riparian exclo- 

sure fences that are BLM responsibility. 



48 



See Section I in the Klamath Falls Resource Area RPS 
Update (page 58) for more accomplishments since 1990. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



'94 Program Plans 



* Construct one mile of pasture division fence in the 

Ward Pasture, Edge Creek allotment to implement a 
deferred rotation grazing system. 

* Construct a livestock and wildlife waterhole in the 

Ward Pasture, Edge Creek allotment to enhance the 
deferred rotation system by spreading livestock use. 

* Reconstruct spring developments in Gerber Riparian 

Demonstration Area (20 spring developments) 

* Thin 150 acres of juniper in the Gerber Riparian 

Demonstration Area. 

* Construct 1-3/4 miles of wetland exclosure fence in the 

Bumpheads Allotment. 

* Issue approximately 95 grazing use licenses. 

* Monitor the grazing use on all utilized I and M category 

allotments. 

* Establish five to ten additional frequency trend studies 

on high priority I category allotments. 

* Perform needed maintenance on riparian fences that are 

BLM responsibility. 

* Appropriate consultation with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife 

Service will occur in regards to grazing and the 
endangered shortnosed sucker. 



* Klamath River Put-In (raft launch site): Constructed 

and rocked lower access loop road and additional 
vehicle parking; enlarged and rocked boat ramp; 
paved access loop road into put-in; installed handicap 
accessible picnic table, parking, toilets, and changing 
areas; installed signs; reseeded after construction; 
maintained main road from Highway 66 to put-in. 

* Klamath River Campground: Removed existing toilet 

vault tank; installed new handicap accessible toilet 
unit; installed two firegrates; installed signs. 

* Topsy Recreation Site: Removed hazard trees; con- 

structed and rocked road and campsites; pumped 
toilets; installed vehicle barricades and signs; 
constructed handicap accessible campsites, parking 
areas, water fountains, boat deck, fishing trail, and 
fishing platform; chip sealed campsite road, campsite 
pads, and Topsy Road; installed firegrates and six 
picnic tables; and repaired fence. 

* Gerber Recreation Site: Maintained Miller Creek trail; 

installed vehicle barrier posts; completed remodeling 
for handicap accessible toilet; and pumped toilets. 

* Completed site plan for Topsy and Klamath River 

campgrounds. 

* Issued 22 Klamath River commercial permits for white- 

water boating. 

* Issued one land-based recreation permit. 



'94 Program Plans 



Recreation Resources 



Public lands in the Klamath Falls Resource Area offer a 
wide variety of recreation opportunities. The program 
strives to provide quality recreation while protecting 
sensitive resources, expanding visitor services and 
interpretation, and enhancing outdoor recreation through 
partnerships. Initiatives such as Back County Byways 
and Watchable Wildlife provide focus and funding to 
increase recreation opportunities. 



* Klamath River Campground: Rebuild and rock roads 

and campsite pads; install barriers and signs; remove 
hazardous trees; and install campfire grates and 
picnic tables. 

* Topsy Recreation Site: Phase 2 of renovation; construct 

day-use picnic pads and interpretive trail; and install 
fire grates and picnic tables. 

* Upper Midway: Construct and rock boat ramp, road to 

campsites, and campsite pads; construct toilet; install 
fire grate, picnic tables, and signs. 

* Potholes: Construct and rock vehicle loop road and 

parking area; install trail to picnic area, picnic tables, 
and fire grates. 



49 



* Surveyor Mountain Snowmobile Trails: Install signs 

and include routes on Southern Oregon Winter Sports 
Trail map. 

* Gerber Recreation Site Road Improvements: Chip seal 

road from county (paved) road, past guard station to 
north and south campground. 

* Wood River Ranch: Install signs and develop facilities. 

Riparian/Wetland 
Management 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area placed emphasis on 
water quality and riparian area monitoring, riparian/ 
watershed/water quality improvement projects, nonpoint 
source pollution control and water rights documentation. 
Range, wildlife, and riparian-wetland projects supported 
BLM's and the State of Oregon's efforts to protect water 
quality under the Clean Water Act and implementation of 
BLM's Riparian-Wetland Initiative for the 1990s. 

A water use inventory was continued to document all 
water development in the district and finalize water rights 
documentation with the State of Oregon. 

Water quality and microinvertebrate sampling and 
analysis was conducted on streams throughout the 
resource area. Macroinvertebrates are useful to indicate 
nonpoint source pollution and cumulative water quality 
effects. Results of this monitoring will be used to assess 
existing water quality and determine whether BLM 
activities result in any trends in water quality or stream 
condition. 



planting will assist in the stabilization and rebuilding 
of streambanks. The Boy Scouts are monitoring their 
plantings to compare survival within and outside of a 
livestock exclosure. 

* Completed purchase of half of the Wood River Ranch 

for wetland restoration. 

* A draft Watershed Management Practices Guide was 

developed for use in the Klamath Falls Resource 
Area. This guide provides a comprehensive sum- 
mary of Best Management Practices and design 
features for all resource area programs. Specialists 
can refer to the guide when designing projects and 
incorporate the appropriate practices to ensure 
protection of water quality, soils, watershed and 
riparian resources. 

* Range and riparian monitoring studies were continued 

in key grazing allotments and riparian areas. Studies 
completed include riparian photo trend, range 
utilization and trend, and allotment use mapping. 
Water quality was monitored on streams to ensure 
compliance with state and national water quality 
statutes. Macroinvertebrate sampling was performed 
to detect nonpoint source pollution problems. 

* Coordination meetings and field tours were held with 

ODFW, Pacific Power and Light, the Weyerhaeuser 
Corporation, USFWS, Forest Service, and the 
Lakeview District Grazing Advisory Board to discuss 
various aspects of riparian-wetland area management. 

* Water rights were pursued for spring and reservoir 

developments, which are critical to the success of 
grazing systems and provide livestock and wildlife 
water away from riparian and wetland areas. Secur- 
ing these water rights ensures continued use of these 
water sources. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* Bear Valley Fence and Water Development: Two miles 

of fencing was constructed to create two new riparian 
pastures. Improvements in riparian area condition are 
expected with periodic rest or early season high- 
intensity, short-duration livestock use. Construction 
of a reservoir will improve livestock distribution, 
provide a source of water for wildlife and direct 
livestock use away from riparian areas. These 
projects are located in the Gerber Riparian Demon- 
stration Area. 

* Hayden Creek Willow Planting: Willows were planted 

in Hayden Creek as part of a Boy Scout project. This 



50 



* Continued cooperative interagency water quality 

sampling of Spencer Creek as part of the Spencer 
Creek CRMP. 

* Created the Wood River Wetland Team, an interagency 

team, to assist in planning for the restoration of the 
Wood River Ranch to wetlands. 



'94 Program Plans 



* Water quality and macroinvertebrate sampling and 
analysis will continue on streams throughout the 
resource area. Results of this monitoring will be used 
to assess existing water quality and determine 
whether BLM activities result in any trends in water 
quality or stream condition. 



* To fulfill its commitment to ecosystem-based manage- 

ment, the BLM is initiating landscape level analysis. 
Through landscape analysis, resource management 
plan objectives and existing landscape patterns and 
resource conditions are translated into definable 
management goals and objectives for each particular 
landscape. Landscape units are built on watershed 
areas for analysis purposes. Analysis will be con- 
ducted in partnership with the Forest Service and will 
be a dynamic process, responding to ongoing 
planning efforts for management of the region's forest 
resources. Through landscape analysis, project work 
and management activities for each unit will be 
analyzed and defined, for both the short- and long- 
term. Public input and involvement in this process is 
encouraged. 

* Gerber Block spring reconstruction: Springs in the 

Gerber Riparian Demonstration Area will receive 
needed reconstruction, redesign, removal of compet- 
ing juniper and fencing of source areas to protect 
their riparian values. These developments are 
important watering sources for livestock and wildlife 
and are integral in directing livestock use away from 
riparian-wetland areas. 



National Forest and the National Park Service. 
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, NACSI, 
Winema National Forest, Pacific Power and Light, 
and Weyerhaeuser are assisting in an inventory of the 
Klamath River for slender sculpin. 

* Wood River Ranch: An EIS and management plan will 

be completed for the Wood River property. Basic 
information will be gathered about the property, 
including inventory of fish and wildlife species; 
botanical and cultural surveys; signing, road and levy 
maintenance; purchase of aerial photos; boundary 
surveys; topographic surveys; and purchase of 
equipment to monitor and administer the property. 

* Riparian-wetland areas will continue to be inventoried 

and monitored to determine progress towards 
achievement of proper functioning condition, assess 
effectiveness of management practices and meet the 
goals and objectives of BLM's Riparian-Wetland 
Initiative for the 1990s. 

* Numerous fencing projects will be maintained to 

continue management and protection of vital riparian- 
wetland resources. 



* Juniper management in the Gerber Riparian Demonstra- 

tion Area: Juniper will be removed in two- to four- 
acre groups around several springs within the Gerber 
Riprian Demonstration Area. Also, 200 acres of 
juniper will be thinned around springs and other 
riparian areas to improve ground cover conditions 
and to enhance the potential for increased water 
availability. This project is designed to benefit 
watersheds that influence fish habitat. 

* Aspen and willow planting: Woody vegetation will be 

planted in riparian areas in the Gerber Riparian 
Demonstration Area to improve bank stabilization 
and achieve proper functioning condition. 

* Bumpheads wetland fence: The Bumpheads Wetland is 

located below the dike of Bumpheads Reservoir in 
the Gerber Riparian Demonstration Area. This 
wetland is unique to the area and supports wildlife 
species not normally encountered. Fencing will be 
constructed to protect the area. 



* The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 

(APHIS) conducts animal damage control on BLM- 
administered lands. APHIS will be initiating NEPA 
analysis of its Animal Damage Control Program for 
its Roseburg District. This area encompasses private 
and federal lands in Klamath and Lake counties. 



Wild Horses and Burros 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area has one wild horse 
herd; the Pokegama Herd Management Area (HMA). 
The HMA is located in the western portion of the resource 
area, west and north of the Klamath River Canyon, south 
of Highway 66 and generally east of Jenny Creek. The 
appropriate management level of the herd is 50 head, with 
a range of 30 to 50 head. Currently, the herd numbers 
approximately 55 head. 



* Aquatic and riparian-dependent species inventory and 
monitoring: Surveys to inventory and monitor 
several important fish and wildlife species are 
planned, which include the shortnosed and Lost River 
suckers, western snowy plover, red-band trout-, 
spotted frog, slender sculpin, and the western pond 
turtle. Spotted frog inventory will be in partnership 
with the Nature Conservancy, ODFW, the Winema 



'93 Program Accomplishments 

* Completed an aerial census of the Pokegama Herd Area 

in February, counting 50 head. 

* Redeveloped upper Potter Reservoir, which provides an 

enhanced water source for wild horses, among other 
benefits. 



51 



* Fenced Fox Lake Reservoir for water quality and 

quantity improvement, aiding wild horses as well as 
livestock and wildlife. 

* Collected utilization monitoring data within the HMA 

covering use by all grazing animals. 



'94 Program Plans 



'94 Program Plans 



* The Klamath Falls Resource Area will be cooperating 
with the National Park Service in preparation of 
necessary documentation for the Secretary's determi- 
nation of designation of the Klamath River. If the 
river is designated, the BLM will develop a manage- 
ment plan. 



* Conduct aerial census of the Pokegama herd in mid- 

winter 1994. 

* Construct Ward Pasture Reservoir adding a new water 

source for all users in an area currently lacking in 
perennial water. 

* The removal of a few head of younger horses, intended 

for local adoption, may be considered if feasible. 

* Collect vegetation monitoring data within the HMA to 

differentiate wild horse use from other grazing 
animals. 



Wilderness 



The wilderness program is focused on interim manage- 
ment. In 1991, the BLM in Oregon completed the 
wilderness reporting process. As a part of this process a 
recommendation on one wilderness study area in the 
Klamath Falls Resource Area (Mountain Lakes WSA) 
was signed by the Secretary of the Interior and has 
forwarded to the President. Until Congress acts on final 
designation of this area as wilderness it will be managed 
so as not to impair their wilderness values. 



Wild & Scenic Rivers 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



The Klamath Falls Resource Area has no designated 
rivers. In 1990, the BLM found the upper Klamath River 
to be eligible and suitable for designation as a scenic river 
under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. During 
the RMP/EIS process, ten river segments in the KFRA 
were studied, six of those segments were found to be 
eligible and only one was also suitable. The upper 
Klamath River is managed under interim protective 
management guidelines. 

The Governor of Oregon has requested that the Secretary 
of the Interior designate the upper Klamath River under 
section 2aii of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. 
The Secretary delegated that authority to the National 
Park Service. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 



* The outstandingly remarkable values in the upper 
Klamath River area (recreation, wildlife, fish, 
historic, prehistoric, and scenic values, and Native 
American traditional use) were protected. 



* Mountain Lakes Wilderness Study Area: completed 
WSA monitoring of 334 acres. 



Wildlife and Fisheries 



The wildlife and fisheries program ensures that fish, 
wildlife, and special status species habitats are protected 
in the operation of the BLM's multiple use programs. 
This is achieved by conducting habitat and animal surveys 
on public lands, developing habitat management plans 
and other special purpose plans to ensure protection of 
critical wildlife values, designing habitat enhancement 
projects, and monitoring of wildlife and other program 
activities to determine their effectiveness. 



'93 Program Accomplishments 

* Pokegama Cooperative Road Closure Area: Planning 
time spent with cooperating agencies and completing 
various co-op habitat improvement projects; assisted 
ODFW with wild turkey transplanting and radio 
telemetry monitoring. 



52 



* Spencer Creek Coordinated Resource Management Plan 

(CRMP): Planning time spent with cooperating 
agencies and working with Weyerhaeuser Company 
on watershed analysis. 

* Watchable Wildlife: Tour route, brochure, and signing 

of the route in the Gerber Riparian Demonstration 
Area. 

* Juniper control: Juniper thinning on the east side to 

improve watershed and big game habitat; completed 
approximately 100 acres this fiscal year. 

* Pine marten inventory: Winter track counts on snow- 

mobile and monitoring bait stations using cameras 
were completed over approximately 70 square miles 
of the west side. 

* Waterfowl/sandhill crane nesting inventory: Nesting 

attemps/success within the Gerber Block inventoried 
on 12 reservoirs and one creek containing 39 nest 
islands and 78 nest structures. 

* Neotropical migratory bird monitoring: Established and 

completed monitoring plots within different habitats 
in the KFRA and the Wood River Ranch. 

* Osprey nest monitoring: Inventory and monitoring 

throughout the nesting season of all nests within the 
Gerber Block. 

* Prairie falcon nest inventory: Conducted field inventory 

of known and suspected falcon nest sites in the 
Klamath River Canyon. 

* Golden eagle nest inventory: Inventory of three golden 

eagle nest sites. 

* Small mammal trapping: Continuation of last years 

work; within the spotted owl density study area. 

* Townsend's Big-eared bat, federal candidate 2 species 

(FC2): Contributed $3,000 towards purchase of a 
"bat detector"; challenge grant with Southern Oregon 
State College and ODFW; inventory and monitoring 
of Salt Caves maternity colony. 

* Northern goshawk surveys (FC2) completed on 

approximately 70,000 acres of potential habitat 
throughout the resource area. Several nests have 
been found; monitoring of nests found and banding 
of young and adults. 

* Spotted owl density study, federal threatened: Com- 

pleted for this years nesting season. 



* Western Pond Turtle (FC2): Survey of potential habitat. 

* Sage grouse (FC2): Cooperated with ODFW in 

conducting lek and brood surveys. 

* Bald eagle nest inventory, federal threatened: Invento- 

ried bald eagle nest sites throughout the resource 
area. 

* Gerber Reservoir Bald Eagle Management Area Plan: 

Completed a management plan that includes existing 
and potential eagle habitat associated with the 
reservoir. This includes the second year of field work 
gathering habitat use and behavioral data on the two 
nesting pairs at the reservoir and completing a timber 
sale plan and starting an EA to improve eagle habitat. 

* Participated with The Nature Conservancy on surveys 

for yellow rails on 4-mile Creek and Wood River 
properties. 

* Participated on a habitat analysis team for Lorella 

Pumped Storage Project. 

* Conducted a yearly coordination meeting with ODFW. 

This was followed by a June field trip in the Poke- 
gama area. 

* Constructed guzzler for wild turkeys and big game in 

Chicken Hills area in cooperation with the National 
Wild Turkey Federation, Oregon Hunter's Associa- 
tion, and ODFW. 

* Preparation of RMP documents, including public 

meetings, responding to comment letters, and 
addressing alternatives. 

* Monitored bald eagle nesting activity at Gerber Reser- 

voir. 

* Conducted preliminary herpotological surveys of Wood 

River Ranch, discovering a reproductive population 
of spotted frogs. 

* Wildlife personnel helped plan and give an presentation 

at the annual Resources and People Camp (RAP) for 
high school students. 

* Conducted section 7 consultations with U.S. Fish and 

Wildlife Service on impacts to spotted owls, and 
shortnosed suckers. 

* Cooperated with the ongoing southeastern Oregon elk 

collaring/telemetry study. 



53 



* Performed maintenance on big game guzzlers in 

coordination with ODFW to eliminate duplication. 

* Endangered sucker inventory: In coordination with the 

Bureau of Reclamation, completed electroshocking 
surveys (for spawning runs) of tributaries of Gerber 
Reservoir and Miller Creek (the outflow of the 
reservoir), and other suspected waters; also com- 
pleted post spawning larval surveys; documented 
large spawning run of shortnose suckers up Ben Hall 
Creek and Barnes Valley Creek and its tributaries; 
conducted similar surveys in canals within the Wood 
River Ranch property. Inventory included water 
quality sampling and long-term placement of 
thermographs in tributaries of Gerber Reservoir. 

* Genetic study of Gerber shortnose suckers: Contributed 

$5,000 challenge grant monies towards inter-agency 
study to determine genetic stock of Gerber Reservoir 
suckers. 

* Warmwater fish inventory: Conducted boat electro- 

shocking surveys of four eastside reservoirs to 
determine survival offish through drought and 92/93 
winter. 

* Fish stocking: Cooperated with ODFW to restock fish 

in reservoirs including Willow Valley, Bump-heads, 
Dog Hollow, and Round Valley. 

* Inventoried the canals on the Wood River Ranch for fish 

species. 



'94 Program Plans 



This section has been divided into three sections: east side 
proposals, west side proposals, and ongoing projects for 
the resource area as a whole. 

East Side Proposals: 

* Section 7 consultation on grazing and timber programs. 

* Conduct a shortnosed and Lost River sucker survey. 

* Maintenance work on riparian fencing. 

* Conduct a sage grouse aerial survey. 

* Implement the Bald Eagle Management Plan in Gerber 

area and Stukel Mountain. 

* Conduct a bald eagle and waterfowl survey. 

* Conduct a Goshawk inventory in the Gerber area. 

54 = 



* Conduct warm water fisheries stocking in the Gerber 

area. 

* Continue plans for the Watchable Wildlife Program in 

the Gerber area, Klamath Canyon, and Wood River. 

* Develop and implement juniper management in the 

Gerber area. 

* Conduct a western pond turtle inventory in the Gerber 

area and Klamath River. 



West Side Proposals: 

* Conduct spotted owl density studies and clearances (for 

timber sales). 

* Conduct goshawk surveys. 

* Assist with a burn plan for the Klamath Canyon. 

* Proceed with a snag creation project. 

* Begin a western pond turtle study. 

* Replace a culvert at Spencer Creek. 

* Begin a slender sculpin inventory. 

* Conduct a spotted frog survey at Surveyor Mountain. 

* Conduct a big-eared bat inventory at Salt Caves. 

* Coordinate a Pokegama elk study with ODFW, Oregon 

Hunter's Association, and the Rocky Mountain Elk 
Foundation. 

Continuing efforts in the resource area include: 

* Pine marten inventory covering approximately 70 

square miles on the west side. 

* Waterfowl/sandhill crane nesting inventory in the 

Gerber block. 

* Neotropical migratory bird monitoring. 

* Osprey nest monitoring in the Gerber Block. 

* Prairie falcon nest inventory in the Klamath River 

Canyon. 

* Golden eagle nest inventory. 



* Bald eagle nest inventory. 

* Coordination with the Weyerhaeuser Co., Pacific Power 

& Light, and ODFW on the Pokegama Cooperative 
Habitat Project. 

* Maintain big game guzzlers in coordination with the 

ODFW. 




Great Horned Owl 



55 



1993 Klamath Falls Resource Area EA Register 



Every year the Klamath Falls Resource Area staff prepares various environmental assessments to help them make decisions 
on whether or not to proceed with proposed projects. The Council on Environmental Quality regulations that guide the 
preparation of environmental documents spell out when an environmental impact statement (EIS) is required and when an 
action can be categorically excluded from preparation of an EIS. However, when those regulations are unclear an environ- 
mental assessment is prepared to determine if an EIS is needed. Based upon the impacts anticipated from the proposed 
action, the action will be carried out, modified (mitigated), or dropped. 

In an effort to involve the public earlier in the process of preparing these environmental documents, a list follows of pro- 
posed projects that have recently had documents prepared, are currently being prepared, or will be prepared sometime soon. 
Ideas and concerns are best considered when input is received early. Environmental documents will be submitted for public 
review before a decision is made, and comments are desired anytime in the process, even before the official comment period. 



Area 

Register 

Number Project Name 



Proposed Action 



Location 



Affected 

Special 

Area 



Est. Completion 
Date and 
Project Leader 



014-93-01 Unassigned 



014-93-02 Unassigned 



014-93-03 Rogers Land 
Sale 



Sale of public land - 
isolated parcel unecon- 
omical to manage. 



Near Algoma 



To be completed 
in December 1993. 
Tom Cottingham 



014-93-04 



Topsy Recreation 
Site Improvement 



Improve barrier free 
(handicap) accessibility 
to campsites, drinking 
water, toilets, boating, 
and fishing. 



One mile south of 
Highway 66 on 
Topsy Road. 



Decision Record 
signed 7/16/93. 
Scott Senter 



014-93-05 



Bear Valley 
Allotment 
Pasture Fence 



For livestock distribution 
& riparian area protection. 



5 miles S.E. of 
Gerber Reservoir. 



Public comment 
period ends 
9/17/93. 
Dana Eckard 



014-93-06 


East Side 


To salvage dead trees in 


Ranges from California/ 




Salvage Timber 


the Gerber Block. 


Oregon border to 




Sale 




Gerber Reservoir 


014-93-07 


Section 3 


Thinning of material 


8 miles west 




Thinning Timber 


less than 16 inches. 


of Keno 




Sale 







Completion date 
unknown - Under 
Protest. 
Mike Bechdolt 



Completed 
10/1/93 
Shane Durant 



56 



Area 

Register 

Number 


Project Name 


Proposed Action 


Location 


Affected 

Special 

Area 


Est. Completion 
Date and 
Project Leader 


014-93-08 


Coyote Reser- 
voir Construction 


Build reservoir to 
better distribute livestock 
& protect riparian areas. 


+/- 5 miles S.E. 
of Gerber Reservoir 




Public comment 
period ends 
9/17/93. 
Dana Eckard 


014-93-09 


Integrated Weed 
Control Plan 


For treatment of 
noxious weeds. 


All KFRA lands 




Decision Record 
signed 7/21/93. 
Lou Whiteaker 


014-93-10 


Gerber Recr. 
Site Road 
Improvement 


Improve roads into 
the recreation site. 


Gerber Recreation 
site. 




EA Summer of 

1994. 

Brian McCarty 


014-93-11 


Universal Studios 
"The River Wild" 
Movie 


Issue permit for filming 
movie in the Klamath 
River Canyon. 


Upper Klamath 
River Canyon 
between rafting 
put-in and OR/ 
CA state line. 


Suitable 
Scenic River 
under WSR 
Act. 


Decision from 
Washington, DC 
September '93. 
Cathy Humphrey 



014-93-12 Barnes Valley 
Riparian Fence 
Completion 



Complete the exclosure 
of Barnes Valley Creek. 



East of Gerber 
Reservoir 



Decision approx. 

11/93 

Bill Lindsey 



014-93-13 Chicken Hills 

Cistern Develop- 
ment 



Build a wildlife 
watering system. 



7 miles SW of 
Keno 



Gayle Sitter 



014-93-14 Gopher Control 



Gopher Control 
7-800 acres/year 
Fall '93 - Fall '97. 



West side 



Public comment 
period ends 
9/21/93 
Bill Johnson 



014-93-15 Site Preparation 



Site preparation by 
mechanical or burning 
150 acres. 



Ward Road, Kent 
Peak, Slipeasy 
Road 



Public comment 
period ends 
9/21/93 
Bill Johnson 



57 



KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA RPS UPDATE 

The current Klamath Falls Resource Area was created in 1988 by combining the Lakeview District's Klamath Falls Resource 
Area with BLM-administered lands in Klamath County previously in the Medford District BLM. This document is the 
second Rangeland Program Summary (RPS) Update (1990 was the last) since reorganization of the resource area. Previous 
Lakeview District RPS updates were in 1982, 1984, and 1987 after publishing the Lakeview Management Framework Plan 
EIS in 1981. Previous Medford District RPS updates were in 1984, 1987, and 1990 after publishing the Medford Grazing 
Management Program EIS in 1984. 

The resource area is currently in the process of completing a resource management plan (RMP) and EIS. The draft Klamath 
Falls Resource Area RMP/EIS was issued in August of 1992. The Proposed RMP/EIS and Record of Decision (ROD) is 
planned to be completed in 1994. The delay in completion of the Proposed RMP/EIS is due to the new direction arising from 
the President's Forest Summit and subsequent deliberations. The ROD will outline the allotment-specific objectives and 
goals desired to protect basic resource values while allowing for significant livestock use of the public lands. 

Since 1990, monitoring has been initiated on all I and M category allotments, as well as some C category allotments. These 
studies provide a baseline for making future changes in management on those allotments. Within 5 years of completion of 
the Klamath Falls RMP/EIS, all I and M category allotments will compare the information collected from the rangeland 
monitoring studies against the land use plan objectives to ascertain whether we are moving towards meeting those objectives 
or not. If we are reasonably moving towards or are meeting resource objectives, then existing management will be affirmed; 
if we are not, management changes will be devised and implemented to ensure movement towards objectives. The Proposed 
RMP/EIS will explain the monitoring and evaluation process in more depth. This plan will also outline how the Range Land 
Reform '94 initiative will be integrated into the resource area's grazing management program. 

Section I - Grazing Use and Management Adjustments 

The following identifies and explains the changes made in allotment management made since 1990 when the last RPS update 
was published. It includes changes in grazing use, categorization, CRMPs, and range improvements. 



Allot. 
No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 

Allotment Categorization 



0102 



Edge Creek 



Allotment partially incorporated into the Pokegama Coopera- 
tive Habitat Project; Wild Horse Census completed. A reduction 
in overall allotment grazing use due to lease limitations of the 
majority private land owner. 



0107 



Dixie 



Allotment partially incorporated into the Pokegama Coopera- 
tive Habitat Project; wild horse census completed. A reduction 
in overall allotment grazing use due to lease limitations of the 
majority private land owner. 



0104 
0147 



Buck Lake 
Grubb Springs 



C Incorporated into the Spencer Creek CRMP. 

C Incorporated into the Spencer Creek CRMP. A reduction in 

overall allotment grazing use due to lease limitations of the 
majority private land owner. 



0811 



Cheyne 



Change from Improve (I) to Custodial (C) category due to low 
potential for improvement or enhanced management, but with 
generally proper use. 



58 



Allot. 

No. 



Allotment 
Name 



Category Adjustments in Allocation, Improvements, and 
Allotment Categorization 



0828 



0829 



0836 



0838 



0846 



0852 



0855 



0860 



0883 



Stukel-Hill 



Horton 



Harpold Chaining 


C 


Windy Ridge 


c 


OK 


c 



Rodgers 



Smith 



McCartie 



0861 


Williams 


M 


0862 


Klamath Forest Estates 


C 


0876 


Bear Valley 


I 



Horton 



0884 


Pankey Basin 


C 


0887 


Pitchlog 


I 


0892 


Williams 


M 


30885 


Wood River Ranch 


None 



Change from I to C category due to low potential for improve 
ment or enhanced management, but with generally proper use. 

Change from I to C category due to low potential for improve 
ment, but with generally proper use. 

Change from I to C category due to satisfactory range conditions, 
low potential for improvement, but with generally proper use. 

Change from I to C category due to satisfactory range conditions, 
low potential for improvement, but with generally proper use. 

Initiation of studies to determine feasibility of a sheep-to-cattle 
conversion. EA scheduled for completion in FY94. 

Fencing around Van Meter Flat reservoir to enhance water 
quality. 

Change from I to C category due to satisfactory range conditions, 
low potential for improvement, but with generally proper use. 

Incorporated into a new revision of the Yainax Butte CRMP. 
Change from I to C category due low potential for improvement 
or enhanced management, but with generally proper use. 

Incorporated into a new revision of the Yainax Butte CRMP. 

Incorporated into a new revision of the Yainax Butte CRMP. 

Completion of a division fence allowing for a two pasture 
deferred rotation beginning in 1994. 

Change from I to C category due to satisfactory range conditions, 
low potential for improvement, but with generally proper use. 

Change from I to C category due to satisfactory range conditions, 
low potential for improvement, but with generally proper use. 

Completion of additional pasture division fencing fully imple- 
menting a four pasture rest-rotation system. 

Incorporated into a new revision of the Yainax Butte CRMP. 

1,540 acres acquired of the 3,220 acre ranch in July 1993. 
Remaining acreage will be pursued via exchange or purchase. 
Grazing allowed through 1 1/30/94 via an existing lease. 



59 



o 



KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA 
GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 



Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 







M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife 


Wild Horses 


Livestock 




Period 


Grazing AMP Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1990/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


(AUM) 


SNU 1 


of Use 


System 2 Date 3 Evaluation 


0101 


Chase Mountain 


C/C 


8,823 


19,680 


1,681 





195 





5/01 - 9/15 


S 


0102 


Edge Creek 


I/I 


8,860 


29,400 


1,781 


100 


207 





5/01 - 9/15 


S - 6 


0103 


Buck Mountain 


C/C 


1,120" 
7.022 5 


8,420" 
33,300 5 


1,643 





204 





5/15 - 10/01 


S 


0104 


Buck Lake 


C/C 


11,971 


4,380 


2,129 





452 





7/01 - 10/15 


S 


0105 


Johnson Prairie 


C/C 


120 


400 








12 





5/01 - 10/31 


S 


0107 


Dixie 


I/I 


3,260" 
2,287= 


14,060" 
8,200 s 


1,028 


50 


415 





5/01 - 9/15 


S - 6 


0140 


Dry Lake 


C/C 


145 


1,040 


10 





10 





5/01 - 6/30 


s 


0141 


Chicken Hills 


C/C 


3,422 


5,340 


931 





NO 





5/15 - 9/15 


s 


0142 


Long Lake 


C/C 


363 


1,160 








IS 





6/16-9/30 


s 


0147 


Grubb Springs 


C/C 


3,524 


34,620 


650 





130 





5/01 - 9/15 


s 


0800 


Adams 


C/C 


40 











6 





5/15-10/31 


s 


0801 


Haught 


C/C 


400 





7 





27 





5/01-7/31 


s 


0802 


Stock Drive 


C/C 


40 











2 





5/01 - 6/30 


s 


0803 


"J" Spring 


C/C 


320 


260 


8 





7 





5/01 - 6/23 


s 


0804 


BarCL 


C/C 


480 





10 





20 


22 


5/01 - 5/31 


s 


0805 


SE80 


C/C 


80 





1 





8 





5/01 - 10/31 


s 


0806 


Two Mile 


C/C 


817 





32 





80 





5/01 - 9/30 


s 


0807 


Barnwell 


C/C 


1,708 





80 





100 





4/21-5/31 


s 


0808 


Lee 


C/C 


40 











10 





6/01 - 8/15 


s 


0809 


Brown 


C/C 


80 





1 





30 





6/01-8/31 


s 


0810 


Brenda 


C/C 


1,300 





48 





124 





5/01 - 9/30 


s 


0811 


Cheyne 


I/C 


840 





40 





51 





5/01 - 6/15 


s 


0812 


Stukel-Coffin 


C/C 


760 





19 





55 





5/15 - 6/30 


s 


0813 


Plum Hills 


C/C 


160 





4 





20 





4/16 - 6/30 


s 



KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA 
GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 



Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 



No. 



Name 



M,I,C 
1990/1993 



Public 
(acres) 



Other 

(acres) 



Wildlife 
(AUMs) 



Wild Horses 
(AUMs) 



Livestock 
(AUM) 



SNU 1 



Period 

of Use 



Grazing AMP Allotment 
System 2 Date 3 Evaluation 



0815 Stukel-Dehlinger C I/I 1,680 560 42 

0816 Stukel-Dehlinger H C/C 440 8 

0817 Drew C/C 720 48 

0818 Bryant-Duncan C/C 200 4 

0819 Dupont C/C 79 

0820 Flesher C/C 160 4 

0821 North Horsefly C/C 988 18 

0822 Jeld-Wen I/I 3,122 3,160 79 

0823 No. Horsefly C/C 920 17 

0824 Jeld-Wen C/C 360 7 

0825 Naylox C/C 760 14 

0826 Haskins C/C 560 11 

0827 Stukel-High C/C 237 5 

0828 Stukel-Hill I/C 960 25 

0829 Horton I/C 760 36 

0830 Hungry Hollow C/C 280 5 

0831 Warlow C/C 460 11 

0832 Jesperson C/C 1,578 60 

0833 Bryant Johnson C/C 40 

0834 Kellison C/C 335 6 

0835 Kethcham C/C 320 16 

0836 Harpold C/C 900 101 

0837 Horton C/C 1,249 32 

0838 Windy Ridge C/C 600 11 

0839 Bryant Loveness C/C 3,440 182 

0840 Bryant Lyon C/C 565 11 
£ 0841 Marshall C/C 348 17 



240 
30 
72 
15 
7 
16 
68 

210 
60 
36 
76 
80 
17 
60 
26 
40 
50 

158 
6 

19 
20 

96 
130 

52 
490 

38 

14 


































4/16 - 9/15 
5/10 - 8/10 
5/01 - 6/30 
5/01 - 5/31 
4/15 - 6/01 
5/01-7/31 
5/01 - 6/15 
5/01 - 7/15 
6/16 - 8/01 
6/01 - 10/15 
6/01 - 9/30 
5/01 - 7/15 
5/01 - 8/31 
5/01 - 6/15 
4/21 - 6/30 
6/01 - 8/31 
5/01 - 9/30 
5/01 - 7/01 
6/01 - 9/30 
5/01 - 6/13 
5/01-7/31 
5/01 - 5/31 
5/16 - 8/15 
5/01 - 6/30 
4/21 - 7/28 
5/01 - 9/30 
4/21 - 5/31 



S 
S 

s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



OS 

to 



KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA 
GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 



Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 







M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife 


Wild Horses 


Livestock 




Period 


Grazing AMP Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1990/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


(AUM) 


SNIP 


of Use 


System 2 Date 3 Evaluation 


0842 


Mas ten 


C/C 


485 





10 





40 





5/01 - 9/15 


S 


0843 


McAuliffe 


C/C 


80 





1 





10 





5/01 -5/31 


S 


0844 


Paddock Butte 


C/C 


440 


240 


11 





31 





5/01 - 6/30 


S 


0845 


K-Hills O'Connor 


C/C 


500 





10 





55 





4/01-5/31 


S 


0846 


OK 


C/C 


1,260 





24 





140 





5/01 - 6/30 


S 


0847 


Swede Cabin 


C/C 


1,921 





36 





108 





5/01 - 6/15 


S 


0848 


Pope 


C/C 


1,044 





19 





70 





5/01 - 9/30 


S 


0849 


Rajnus Bros. 


C/C 


480 





10 





32 





4/15-8/31 


S 


0850 


Wilkinson 


C/C 


320 





6 





18 





5/01 - 6/05 


S 


0851 


Harpold Ridge 


M/M 


1,043 





49 





108 





4/21 - 6/30 


D - 6 


0852 


Rodgers 


I/I 


2,549 





65 





249 





4/15 - 8/31 


S 


0853 


7C 


C/C 


688 





13 





104 





5/01 - 6/30 


S 


0854 


Jump 


C/C 


200 





4 





20 





5/01-5/31 


S 


0855 


Bryant Smith 


I/C 


1,140 





29 





109 





5/15-8/31 


S 


0856 


Bryant Stastny 


C/C 


440 





11 





70 





5/10 - 9/30 


S 


0857 


Bryant Taylor 


C/C 


1,080 





18 





74 





4/15 - 9/30 


s 


0858 


Venable and Biaggi 


I/M 


6,448 





237 





300 





5/01 - 6/30 


D - 6 


0859 


Cunard 


I/I 


370 





7 





60 





5/01-7/31 


s - s 


0860 


McCartie 


JVC 


545 





25 





83 





5/01-5/31 


s 


0861 


Williams 


M/M 


2,520 





119 





120 





7/01 - 9/30 


D - 6 


0862 


Klamath Forest Estates 


C/C 


2,520 





47 





47 





5/01-5/31 


s 


0863 


Wirth 


C/C 


1,360 





25 





113 





4/15 - 10/15 


s 


0864 


Rajnus & Son 


C/C 


1,440 





28 





110 





5/01 - 6/30 


s 


0865 


Mills Creek 


C/C 


280 





5 





40 





5/01 - 6/14 


s 


0876 


Bear Valley 


I/I 


5,018 


4,780 


128 





475 





6/21-8/31 


s 


0877 


Bumpheads 


I/I 


9,220 


220 


236 





420 


265 


4/21 - 6/30 


D 1983 6 


0878 


Campbell 


C/C 


1,465 


3,140 


38 





47 


12 


5/01 - 10/26 


S 



KLAMATH FALLS RESOURCE AREA 
GRAZING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 



Forage Allocation and Allotment Summary 







M,I,C 


Public 


Other 


Wildlife 


Wild Horses 


Livestock 




Period 


Grazing 


AMP 


Allotment 


No. 


Name 


1990/1993 


(acres) 


(acres) 


(AUMs) 


(AUMs) 


(AUM) 
12 


SNU 1 
15 


of Use 
5/01 -8/31 


System 2 
S 


Date 3 


Evaluation 


0879 


Devaul 


C/C 


240 


320 


7 





_ 


0881 


Goodlow 


C/C 


285 


640 


8 





32 


52 


5/01-8/31 


S 


- 


- 


0882 


Horsefly 


M 


26,356 


4,779 


706 





2,656 


2,075 


4/21 - 6/30 


HS.DRR 


1973 


1986 6 


0883 


Horton 


I/C 


880 


342 


47 





58 


211 


4/21 - 5/20 


S 


- 


- 


0884 


Panky Basin 


VC 


282 


508 


7 





43 


39 


5/15 - 8/31 


S 


- 


- 


0885 


Dry Prairie 


I/I 


7,231 


3,624 


204 





608 


392 


5/01 -8/31 


HS,DRR 


1982 


6 


0886 


Horse Camp Rim 


I/I 


9,180 


40 


235 





445 





5/01 -7/31 


HS.DRR 


1974 


1980 6 


0887 


Pitchlog 


l/l 


9,280 


1,040 


275 





434 


796 


5/10-6/30 


HS.DRR 


1982 


6 


0888 


Rock Creek 


I/C 


2,750 


1,200 


149 





216 


639 


5/01 - 6/20 


RR 


. 


- 


0889 


Timber Hill 


I/I 


2,937 


760 


75 





270 


134 


6/21 - 7/31 


S 


- 


6 


0890 


Willow Valley 


I/I 


20,460 


887 


1,101 





1,320 


444 


4/21 - 6/20 


HS.DRR 


1971 


1986 6 


0892 


Williams 


M/M 


1,790 





46 





75 





5/01-5/31 


S 


- 


6 


0893 


Fields 


C/C 


180 





5 





6 





4/15 - 5/20 


S 


_ 


- 


0894 


Voight 


C/C 


112 





2 





8 





5/01 - 6/14 


s 


_ 


_ 


0895 


Harpokl Canyon 


C/C 


760 





20 





76 





5/01 - 9/30 


s 


- 


- 


0896 


McFall 


C/C 


600 





11 





60 





5/01 - 6/30 


s 


_ 


_ 


30885 


Wood River Ranch" 


Not 
Classified 


1,320 


1,650 


- 





3,200 





5/1 -11/30 


s 


- 


- 






* Explanation of changes in allotment narrative. 

1 SNU = Suspended Nonuse 

2 DRR - Deferred Rest Rotation; RR = Rest Rotation; D = Deferred Rotation; S = Season Long; HS = High Intensity, Short Duration 

3 Date of most recent AMP or AMP revision. 

4 Acres arc located within the Medford District boundary, but are administered by the Klamath Falls Resource Area, Lakeview District. 

5 Acres arc located within the Lakeview District boundary. 

Allotment evaluations on all I and M allotments will be completed within 5 years of issuance of the Record of Decision on the KFRA Proposed Resource Management Plan and EIS. 
7 The Wood River Ranch property was acquired 7/1 6/93 with an existing grazing lease through 1 1/30/94. The lease and grazing use is recognized through that date, although only as temporary 
non-renewable use. 



64 



Mailing List Update for the Lakeview Resource Area 



In our continuing effort to serve the public more efficiently, we are updating our mailing list system. Because the BLM is 
involved in many different management activities and material is made available to you, we would appreciate it if you would 
take a minute to make sure we have the correct information, such as your name and address. Listed below are the different 
mailers that are available when a program is updated or information released in the Lakeview Resource Area. After deciding 
which activities you would be interested in receiving, mark the appropriate space provided below and mail to us by Novem- 
ber 1, 1993 at the address stated below. If you are changing your name or address please supply us with your old name or 
address. Thank you for helping us keep our costs down. 

Environmental Assessments (Forestry and Multiple Resources) 

Areas of Critical Environmental Concern 

Cultural Resources 

Energy and Minerals 

Range Management 

Recreation 

Fish and Wildlife 

Wilderness 

Wild and Scenic Rivers 

Forestry 

Lands/Realty/Right-of-ways 



Please remove my name from all mailing lists 
Please change my name to: 

Old Name: 

Please change my address to: 



Old Address: 



After completing please mail to: 



BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

Lakeview District 

Attention: Planning 

1000 Ninth Streets. 

Lakeview, OR 97630 

OR CALL 
Lisa Swinney @ 503-947-2177 



55 



Mailing List Update for the Klamath Falls Resource Area 

In our continuing effort to keep publication costs down, we are reviewing our mailing list. The BLM is involved in many 
different areas and because material is available to the public we would appreciate it if you would take a minute to make sure 
we have the correct information, such as name, address, and preference of material requested. At the top right of the mailing 
label there will be codes ranging from 1 1 through 51. Those codes represent the different mailers that are available when a 
program is being updated or information released. After reviewing the available mailers and the code(s) on your label, and 
you would like to change anything, mark in the appropriate space provided below and mail to us by November 1, 1993 at the 
address stated below. If you are changing your name or address please supply us with your old name or address. Thank you 
for helping us keep our costs down. 

1 1 - Klamath Falls Resource Area RMP - Executive Summary of all western Oregon Districts 

12 - Klamath Falls Resource Area RMP - Full RMP/EIS (1000+ pages) 

13 - Klamath Falls Resource Area RMP Summary 

21 - Upper Klamath River 

22 - Wood River 

23 - Wood River Wetland Team 

3 1 - Recreation 

32 - Environmental Assessments - Forestry 

33 - Environmental Assessments - Other Resources (such as recreation or grazing) 

34 - Environmental Assessments - All 
41 - Grazing 

51 -Cultural 



Please remove my name from all mailing lists 
Please change my name to: 



Old Name: 



Please change my address to: 



Old Address: 



Please add the following mailing codes to my name: 



Please remove the following mailing codes from my name: 



After completing please mail to: BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

Klamath Falls Resource Area 

Attention: Planning 

2795 Anderson Avenue, Bldg. 25 

Klamath Falls, OR 97603 

OR CALL 
Susan Bond @ 503-885-4253 



66 



•& U.S. GOVERNMENT VKINTINC OFFICE: 1993—790-122 / 81613 REGION NO. 10 



1 



i^H^^HKiKmwa 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

LAKEVIEW DISTRICT OFFICE 

1000 NINTH STREET S. 

LAKEVIEW, OREGON 97630 

OFFICIAL BUSINESS 
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300 



Forward and Address 
Correction Requested 



FIRST CLASS MAIL 

POSTAGE & FEES PAID 

Bureau of Land Management 

Permit No. G-76